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first aid training

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Hi - can anyone tell me to what level of first aid are we as SC's are trained to and assuming it is the same as our regular colleagues?

Is it standard across the nation or varied from force to force.

I know I had to attend 2 day first aid course which is then refreshed annually - if we miss the refresh course we have to redo the 2 day one again...  Im just not certain as to what LEVEL of training this is considered equal to?

 

Cheers :)

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There's a common standard which can be found in the NCALT portal. It should be the same for all front line officers. Custody and other specialist teams have different needs and therefore different packages that reflect that.

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I've just done and passed my ELS assessment as a new PC for the Met, I did the same during my time as a special.

It is re-taught and re-assessed every 12 months, OST is re-taught and re-assessed every 6 months.

ELS in the Met covers:

Applying bandages and positions to seat casualty in depending on injury.

Recovery position

CPR 

Defib use

The assessment goes as follows, you're called to a scene and someone is injured, they explain the injury and the location and you put them in the required position, whilst applying the bandage, you must also ask the following questions:

S - Signs & Symptoms - checking for them

A - Allergies, ask patient if they have any allergies

M - Medication - Are they currently taking any medication for anything

P - Past medical history  - Any past medical history relevant to the injury

L - Last ins and outs, when did they last eat/drink etc.

E - Environment, checking for danger when you first arrive whilst gloving up.

In the assessment I had you had to ask each of the questions before asking the staff (roleplaying a passer by as well as assessing) for an ambulance.

The casualty then goes unconscious but is breathing, so you run through DRABC

D - Danger, re-assess and check for any new danger.

R - Response, bend down and shout into both ears "Open your eyes", pinch the shoulders and both ears to check for response

A - Airway - open the mouth and check for no obstructions, tilt the head back and hold the chin up whilst keeping the mouth open

B - Breathing, put your ear close to their mouth and count to ten listening for breathing, looking down towards their feet to see if their stomach rises and falls as per normal breathing.

C - Circulation - Checking for any obvious blood matter, which would indicate injuries.

You then had to update the passer by and tell them to update the ambulance.

You're then checking for DOTS - running your hand over their body and checking the hand for any blood.

Deformities

Open Wounds

Tenderness

Swelling

The patient then goes unconscious - at this point the person playing the victim leaves the room and a manikin is thrown towards you, immediately we had to run through DRABC again, and whilst withdrawing a faceshield from our pocket and starting chest compressions shout to the passer by and tell them to update the ambulance again, and also ask them to obtain a defib from around the corner on the wall.

You're doing CPR for about 1/2 cycles before the roleplaying passer by (who in our case was actually also assessing us) returns with the defib, you're then expected to setup the defib correctly, whilst verbally running through the checks, no metals no liquids, no gases, no indirect or direct contact whilst the charge is building, when the machine shouts "Shock advised", you give a final "STAND CLEAR" holding a hand up before pressing the shock button, we then had to continue another round of CPR and deliver a second shock, using the same procedure verbalizing the checks each time.

They then tell you to stop and run through the feedback whilst you pack the kit away, in our case we all passed.

I am surprised to find that in some of the county forces here AED's (defibs) are an "add on".

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, PC Will said:

I've just done and passed my ELS assessment as a new PC for the Met, I did the same during my time as a special.

It is re-taught and re-assessed every 12 months, OST is re-taught and re-assessed every 6 months.

ELS in the Met covers:

Applying bandages and positions to seat casualty in depending on injury.

Recovery position

CPR 

Defib use

The assessment goes as follows, you're called to a scene and someone is injured, they explain the injury and the location and you put them in the required position, whilst applying the bandage, you must also ask the following questions:

S - Signs & Symptoms - checking for them

A - Allergies, ask patient if they have any allergies

M - Medication - Are they currently taking any medication for anything

P - Past medical history  - Any past medical history relevant to the injury

L - Last ins and outs, when did they last eat/drink etc.

E - Environment, checking for danger when you first arrive whilst gloving up.

In the assessment I had you had to ask each of the questions before asking the staff (roleplaying a passer by as well as assessing) for an ambulance.

The casualty then goes unconscious but is breathing, so you run through DRABC

D - Danger, re-assess and check for any new danger.

R - Response, bend down and shout into both ears "Open your eyes", pinch the shoulders and both ears to check for response

A - Airway - open the mouth and check for no obstructions, tilt the head back and hold the chin up whilst keeping the mouth open

B - Breathing, put your ear close to their mouth and count to ten listening for breathing, looking down towards their feet to see if their stomach rises and falls as per normal breathing.

C - Circulation - Checking for any obvious blood matter, which would indicate injuries.

You then had to update the passer by and tell them to update the ambulance.

You're then checking for DOTS - running your hand over their body and checking the hand for any blood.

Deformities

Open Wounds

Tenderness

Swelling

The patient then goes unconscious - at this point the person playing the victim leaves the room and a manikin is thrown towards you, immediately we had to run through DRABC again, and whilst withdrawing a faceshield from our pocket and starting chest compressions shout to the passer by and tell them to update the ambulance again, and also ask them to obtain a defib from around the corner on the wall.

You're doing CPR for about 1/2 cycles before the roleplaying passer by (who in our case was actually also assessing us) returns with the defib, you're then expected to setup the defib correctly, whilst verbally running through the checks, no metals no liquids, no gases, no indirect or direct contact whilst the charge is building, when the machine shouts "Shock advised", you give a final "STAND CLEAR" holding a hand up before pressing the shock button, we then had to continue another round of CPR and deliver a second shock, using the same procedure verbalizing the checks each time.

They then tell you to stop and run through the feedback whilst you pack the kit away, in our case we all passed.

I am surprised to find that in some of the county forces here AED's (defibs) are an "add on".

 

 

 

For EFAW, training on a DEFIB is an added extra as per HSE Standards:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/priced/l74.pdf#page=36

Ref: Automated external defibrillators 44 Where an employer decides to provide a defibrillator in the workplace, those who may need to use it should be trained (see ‘Further information’). Training can provide additional knowledge and skills and may promote greater confidence in the use of a defibrillator.

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