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DaleB

Should British Police receive a firearm?

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Perhaps we should all drive tanks 'just in case'?

I'd argue a pistol is more durable than a tank for police work.

Edited by Radman
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Why is policing a city different to policing a rural area?

Because there is a different breed of crime in the city areas, anyone who disagrees is just being foolish. When I worked in the counties you rarely heard of any gang vs gang related incidents, however in London it's almost every day. In the City you have huge concentrated urban areas which causes issues.

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Because there is a different breed of crime in the city areas, anyone who disagrees is just being foolish. When I worked in the counties you rarely heard of any gang vs gang related incidents, however in London it's almost every day. In the City you have huge concentrated urban areas which causes issues.

Similarly I doubt that any city officers would go to illegal hare coursing or lamping jobs, where you are quite likely to come across people with shotguns (possibly illegally held).

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Similarly I doubt that any city officers would go to illegal hare coursing or lamping jobs, where you are quite likely to come across people with shotguns (possibly illegally held).

I'm in a fairly rural location, we have a few deer and hares as well as a fishing pond nearby. In the last year alone whilst walking the dog I've come across a few people with rifles and crossbows doing a little hunting. The fishing pond tends to be exhausted by eastern Europeans who go lamping at night time, along with rather large knives, they even saw down the odd tree for their wood burning fires. Come across someone tooled up like that in the evening with a armed response some 20 miles away can be sobering. The reason why no ones hurt is because on the most part they're unchallenged and jump onto their quad and they're off.

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I'm in a fairly rural location, we have a few deer and hares as well as a fishing pond nearby. In the last year alone whilst walking the dog I've come across a few people with rifles and crossbows doing a little hunting. The fishing pond tends to be exhausted by eastern Europeans who go lamping at night time, along with rather large knives, they even saw down the odd tree for their wood burning fires. Come across someone tooled up like that in the evening with a armed response some 20 miles away can be sobering. The reason why no ones hurt is because on the most part they're unchallenged and jump onto their quad and they're off.

Sorta why I believe specialised areas of policing shouldn't just be left to the Home Office forces to sort out - they get left and for the most part ignored.

The dangers of nationalisation in my opinion.

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I'm in a fairly rural location, we have a few deer and hares as well as a fishing pond nearby. In the last year alone whilst walking the dog I've come across a few people with rifles and crossbows doing a little hunting. The fishing pond tends to be exhausted by eastern Europeans who go lamping at night time, along with rather large knives, they even saw down the odd tree for their wood burning fires. Come across someone tooled up like that in the evening with a armed response some 20 miles away can be sobering. The reason why no ones hurt is because on the most part they're unchallenged and jump onto their quad and they're off.

Rifles can be explained as they are often used, but bow hunting? Very naughty...

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Firearms availability is a thorny subject, not least from the expense involved in establishing teams, training officers and then maintaining the required level of skill. That is what deters a lot of forces from trying to meet perceived needs within their areas. Even Taser is a very expensive option, even to establish. £2500 a unit, £400 a DPM and £28 a cartridge. Given their shelf-life, upkeep and damage levels, plus training, and the shine goes off what is a useful deterrent.

Equally there is the considerable stigma to being seen as the Chief Con who turned their force into paramilitary police. People immediately feel a degree of security when such teams are rolled out or publicised, but when the budget sword has to fall and there is a risk to response or NPT, then the need is questioned. Catch 22.

Luckily there has not been the level of requirement to provide a armed response to extreme exceptions as have occurred in the past on the UK mainland. ARVs provide the required response to such as terrorist or hostage situations, or to serious crime.

Even the use of CS carries a painful level of paperwork and procedure; so rather than use live rounds, the use of AEP (baton rounds) is a very attractive option. Unfortunately AEP has the baggage of Northern Ireland, and the effect on a senior officer's career for authorising the use of 'plastic' has prevented more widespread availability.

But in reality AEP remains a workable and more acceptable less-lethal means of dealing with many of the situations that would usually result in ARV being tasked. It would take a considerable effort to change the perception of their use on the part of SLTs, but surely the use of two or three rounds of AEP to render a subject more approachable have much more PR acceptability than FB footage of officers whaling the ****** out of a suspect with batons, let alone the fallout of the use of live rounds.

Within certain strictures AEP is a more cost-effective and useful tool, and less contravertial to Glock or long arms in a more freely-available basis. One weapon per shift, two trained gunners per section on duty. And the very sight of this being deployed is often enough to make people think twice about misbehaving.

For the record, I am not a rep for any company involved with AEPs. ;-)

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I'm not convinced that live rounds are necessary. I think in the case of an active shooter then yes its a good call but for standard day to day policing I would say that a taser does the job just as well. Just the sight of a taser has made some bad people calm down very quickly when I have been on duty. The bright yellow space age looking weapon is less lethal and requires a lower threshold than live rounds for use. I know they are expensive but I would be going for these even above Stevies beloved AEP's (only a joke ;) ). From what I have seen of AEP's, which is admittedly not much, they look a lot like handguns (please someone correct me if I am wrong) and as such they may prompt a much higher level of response from a suspect (i.e. they think they are fighting for their life all of a sudden and are more likely to do more to preserve it...).

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:-) Yes, I like AEPs as they do the job they are meant for.....and can often do it without a lot of the procedure or paperwork attached to other LLO options.

They resemble a piece of scaffold piping with a butt and a sight on top. Often the sight of them is enough for folk to behave. And people soon learn what the safe range for them is and back off accordingly, and think twice about moving back.

http://s199.photobucket.com/user/furryforest/media/7522cfe3.jpg.html

And this guy is clearly ready to rock and roll.....

Edited by Stevie6544

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