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double-six

S172 ... what next?

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Apologies for positng here but I didn't want this thread to be open to the world, however I obviously understand if it needs to be moved.

In short, I issued a S172 form to demand the driver details of a vehicle which failed to stop. There was no registered keeper at the time of the offence so I issued the 172 to the insured. He has now replied giving a name and address of a motor trader, however the address (at least) is fictional.

The current insured party on PNC is the same as who was the insured party on PNC at the time of the offence, although the current policy has a start date of after the offence. I've not checked whether the insurance cover has been continuous or whether there's been a lapse.

There is now a registered keeper (since after the offence), not the same person as who holds the insurance, and the keeper isn't listed as a named driver (he may have his own separate policy).

So in short, what would you do? The offences I issued the 172 for were only minor (careless driving and fail to stop) - in fact, I was planning of dealing with by verbal advice at the time unitl he made off. However, now I don't want to send out the message to the driver that he can get away this and therefore I want to pursue it.

Any advice, or is it really that easy to escape prosecution?!

Thanks in advance.

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A legal disclaimer is bound to be added to this thread at some point, but I'd visit the person you issued the 172 to and if the details turn out to be false, you could consider fixing him with Failing to Provide under s.172 (3), or potentially, Perverting the Course of Justice.

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I think it depends how far you want to go with it, I always ask myself, is it really in the public interest to pursue?

You could go and see the person you NIP-ped and ask about the motor trader, ask why he still insured the vehicle? (you might get an admission if you turn up). If that turns up nothing go see the new owner and ask where the vehicle was purchased and work backwards.

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Thanks. Think I will go see the person I issued the form to to investigate. The address supplied of the supposed new keeper does not exist. Ok it's only a minor offence and you could say it's not worth the effort, but I feel it's important to follow through . It could easily have been a much more serious incident, plus it sends out the wrong message if we allow it to be so easy to get away with. Will seek advice from our traffic unit when I'm next on duty, too. Thanks again for the replies.

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Thanks. Think I will go see the person I issued the form to to investigate. The address supplied of the supposed new keeper does not exist. Ok it's only a minor offence and you could say it's not worth the effort, but I feel it's important to follow through . It could easily have been a much more serious incident, plus it sends out the wrong message if we allow it to be so easy to get away with. Will seek advice from our traffic unit when I'm next on duty, too. Thanks again for the replies.

I came to a similar conclusion when I had a FTS at a speed check once: it is a minor traffic issue but, on the other hand, if someone fails to stop for a number of police officers in yellow coats, one of whom is stood in the road issuing #1 stop signal, what does it say about their driving in general, if say a normal MOP stepped out in front of them.

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double-six, for what it's worth I totally agree with you on this, the driver that failed to stop has something to hide,and it is the principle involved, no question about it,I had someone fail to stop for me in the mid eighties I think it was, but I was on point duty,doing a big parade,had the traffic stopped while the parade cleared the junction,which it did, I wanted to let the traffic flow, and it could have done without any problem,i waited and waited for the word to come through but nothing,I radioed up to see if I could let them go but the inspector came back and said to "keep it stopped for now"to this day I have no idea why he said that, however,this driver who was first in the long line had clearly had enough of this fiasco,and I couldn't blame him in the slightest but he literally drove through me,I could have turned a blind eye very easily, just sighed etc and done no more about it,but I got someone about six hundred yards down the road to stop him and give him some "suitable advice"which they did,but re your case,if this had been me he did it to,(assuming I had taken and passed the compliant stop training course)I would leave no stone unturned until I found him,probably asking a few more specials to help me make enquires if got a bit convoluted,all good training for them, (smiley face here)I woudnt be at all surprised if it turned out that no end of offences are being perpetrated by this guy,I don't profess to be an expert in this field but before you go to see this person you could consider writing down a list of carefully worded questions to ask so he/she can't wriggle out of it and give you some lame / plausible excuses.Rich.ps. Good hunting.

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