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Henro Plod

The Reporting of Police Corruption & Misconduct

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Institute of Criminal Justice Studies

University of Portsmouth

Room 5.32 St George's Building

141 High Street

Portsmouth

PO1 2HY

The Reporting of Police Corruption & Misconduct

I would like to invite you to take part in my research study by completing an online survey questionnaire. The study is an exploration of the "Blue Code of Silence", which is the theory that police personnel are reluctant to report their colleagues' corruption or misconduct.

This research study forms part of my MSc Counter Fraud and Counter Corruption Studies degree. You have been identified as a potential respondent through social and professional networks. I am contacting you in the capacity of a student researcher. It is entirely up to you whether you participate, your choice will have no impact, either positive or negative, on any working relationship we might have, but your response would be valued. All parts of the questionnaire are optional.

Please click here to access the questionnaire.

Thank you for your interest.

Researcher: Stuart Morishita Dubois

Academic Supervisor: Dr Martin Tunley Tel: 02392 843986

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Regular since Jan 2007, after 3 years as a Special in a different force.

But you're at Portsmouth Uni? :new_hmmm:

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But you're at Portsmouth Uni? :new_hmmm:

Ah, a suspicious mind is to be applauded. However, I was a Special in Strathclyde while living in Glasgow, I now live and work in London, but am completing my MSc by Distance Learning online.

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Tis true. I was going to do a distance learning degree with Portsmouth myself.

I would definitely recommend Portsmouth. A number of Universities offer distance learning courses, but Portsmouth's "Institute of Criminal Justice Studies" has a really wide selection of Police / CJS degrees at Bachelor / Master / Doctor level.

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I started the same degree myself, but have to give up when I realised I would not have enough time to put in to make a success of it.

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The reason I didn't pursue it is the same as Rosco`s. I couldn't commit the time to it and it would've been a waste of money.

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Police officers are obliged to report such things anyway...

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Keep on topic please.

Sorry Rocket, that was my fault for encouraging discussion about Uni / degrees - guilty of hijacking my own thread!

I think the point of the research is to establish whether they actually do or not.... and the reasons for that! :rolleyes:

Hades, yes exactly, thank you. I have my own theories and I am interested to see if the results will back them up.

I think there are some very interesting scenarios in that survey.

Burnsy, thank you. I have to give credit to another Portsmouth Uni student who did a similar study previously, I have changed the follow up questions, and therefore the emphasis for my study, but I have used his scenarios. He works in the Professional Standards Dept for a police force and he devised the scenarios based on exactly the kind of misconduct issues his department is dealing with on a daily basis. So the scenarios are very realistic and believable.

All done for you.

Futures. Thank you, that really is appreciated. I received approval from my university's Research Ethics Committee yesterday to go ahead with the research and so early this morning I started to post the link to the survey on this forum and other similar forums. I have just checked and I have 14 responses so far. I am happy with this for the first day. I am hoping for my total responses to be at least low hundreds to be able to draw credible conclusions from them.

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I note some of the options for quantifying ones response are not relevant to Specials and in some instances PCSO's. One or two of the questions are worded slightly strangely as well. If we as officers are unaware of what is going on (as alluded to by the way some of the scenarios are worded) how can we formulate an accurate response to how we would deal with those scenarios?

I have left you some feedback with regards to this.

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I note some of the options for quantifying ones response are not relevant to Specials and in some instances PCSO's. One or two of the questions are worded slightly strangely as well. If we as officers are unaware of what is going on (as alluded to by the way some of the scenarios are worded) how can we formulate an accurate response to how we would deal with those scenarios?

I have left you some feedback with regards to this.

Thank you for the feedback.

In designing the questionnaire I had a choice between 1) leaving the responses entirely open for free text - which might put off people from completing the questionnaire as it is too much effort to formulate a personal response for each scenario, and would be much more difficult to analyse results, or, 2) providing a list of possible responses for people to tick - which is easier, but probably too restrictive for everyone. So the preferred option 3) was to provide a list of common responses (from my pilot survey), and also include the "Other" option for people who wanted to write their own responses.

I also included the 'please write any comments about your responses here' option to allow people to voice concerns such as yours. Previous similar studies have concentrated purely on regular police officers, but I wanted to include the whole 'police family' as I think we all have the potential for varying degrees of corruption and misconduct in our various roles, and more importantly, we could all witness / become aware of colleagues' corruption and misconduct. As I stated above, I did not write the scenarios, I have used the same set of scenarios presented in a similar previous study by an academic who also works in a police force's Professional Standards Dept. He formulated the scenarios based on issues his department deals with.

Which leads on to the concern about the actual scenarios and how we could possibly be aware of them. Well, I just have to claim poetic licence here I'm afraid, it is not real life, it is just a questionnaire. I am not asking respondents to tell me what they have actually done in real life situations, and I cannot set up "integrity test" style operations to put people into these situations and watch what they actually do (I wish I could!). So, I have to ask respondents to suspend their disbelief and use a little imagination to put themselves in the situation somehow, then try to think what their 'likely' response would be. Obviously, when I write up my dissertation, these limitations will need to be discussed, but I think they are the same limitations of most questionnaires over real life observations.

Anyway, thank you again for taking the time to complete the survey and leave feedback :) it is very much appreciated.

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Anytime.

From experience, a respondents interpretation of a question or choice of answer can sometime skew the results, despite how specifically (or ambiguous) the question or choice may be.

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Good survey with, in all honesty, some thought provoking scenarios. I can imagine that there would be some officers that would see that as an eye opener, sadly.

All done for you,

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Institute of Criminal Justice Studies

University of Portsmouth

Room 5.32 St George's Building

141 High Street

Portsmouth

PO1 2HY

The Reporting of Police Corruption & Misconduct

I would like to invite you to take part in my research study by completing an online survey questionnaire. The study is an exploration of the "Blue Code of Silence", which is the theory that police personnel are reluctant to report their colleagues' corruption or misconduct.

This research study forms part of my MSc Counter Fraud and Counter Corruption Studies degree. You have been identified as a potential respondent through social and professional networks. I am contacting you in the capacity of a student researcher. It is entirely up to you whether you participate, your choice will have no impact, either positive or negative, on any working relationship we might have, but your response would be valued. All parts of the questionnaire are optional.

Please click here to access the questionnaire.

Thank you for your interest.

Researcher: Stuart Morishita Dubois

Academic Supervisor: Dr Martin Tunley Tel: 02392 843986

If you have already completed the questionnaire; then please accept my thanks, if not; the link will remain open for another two weeks and your response would be valued.

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Interesting survey and it has brought up some valid issues - I've completed it for you - good luck and let us know the (anonymous) results of the survey! I'd like to see what other people have put...

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Thank you to everyone who completed the survey.

I didn't have a very high response rate, but the lack of quantity was more than compensated by the quality of the responses and provided me with plenty of material to analyse and write about. I completed my dissertation in the Spring and was awarded my degree, with Merit, in the Summer.

If you are interested in the results of my research, the College of Policing has published my dissertation on the National Police Library here: The Blue Code of Silence.

(I would recommend consulting the Contents Page first, rather than attempting to wade through the whole dissertation!)

Edited by Henro Plod

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A very interesting dissertation, worth a read if you get time, especially the responses section.

Yes, I quickly read through it too, and agree.

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