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Blogs

 

Jose Mourinho target of attempted Airport Stabbing

Slightly down-played story below, I understand Eduardo stepped infront of what looked like a punch thrown at Mourinho, who was then rapidly removed from the scene, it wasn't until he boarded the bus that he saw the blood he realised it had been a knife. Unfortunate about the injury but well done Eduardo for 'stepping in' and getting the job done. This is the latest in a long line of security problems for Mourinho, death threats ahead of the 2004 Champions League final, a plot to kidnap Mourinho and/or his family when he was the coach of Inter Milan, another plot to raid his home... .......................................... A bodyguard for football manager Jose Mourinho is believed to have been stabbed protecting the Real Madrid and former Chelsea boss as he signed autographs. The minder was injured by a sharp object during an incident at A Coruna airport in northwest Spain. A security detail for Mourinho rushed him away as the injured guard, identified as Eduardo, discovered blood pouring from a wound. The security staff believe the assailant's intended target was 48-year-old Mourinho, according to Spanish reports. The injured bodyguard was treated for a 4cm wound. Jose Mourinho found out about the stab scare after the event The football boss, initially unaware, was later told of the attack which occurred last week. Newspaper El Periodico said: "Mourinho stopped to sign autographs in arrivals, where a large number of Madrid fans were waiting for the team. "The bodyguard was near the manager and noticed he had been stabbed in the armpit. "Mourinho was very worried by the incident." Investigators have scoured CCTV footage and subsequently identified a tall man wanted in connection with the attack. Source

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

A fond farewell!

Well my policing journey has come to an end at this time. I have left my position within communications for pastures new and the prospect of better career options in the private sector. I do genuinely believe that i have timed this well, what with the way the current budget situation is and the way that within my force they are projecting the cuts, going through the ongoing project of slashing here and tucking there. Im sad to see my time go though. I have worked for over a year within the police service and it has well and truley opened my eyes to the world around me. Looking back i now considered myself to have been naieve and narrow minded about the work involved within working for the police force. Ive had my fair share of "horrible" jobs, also my fair share of "the good nicks" and also the pure "bang my head against a wall" type jobs and i am proud to be able to say that i have contributed to modern society, helped people who genuinely needed it and also **i hope to think anyway** made a difference in the small scale of things. I have no misconceptions that should in the future a position arise that i would like to take on, i would join again at the drop of a hat and not hesitate to continue on doing the long hard and arduous shifts with no thanks or recognition. So on a final note, my respect goes out to all, far and wide who work for the police service, whether it be in a officer or staffing capacity AND also wish those well weith what the future may hold as it is uncertain times. PP signing off!!

policeprospect

policeprospect

 

Piracy - Guns don't work so we'll try 300 Gallons of Pepperspray

As you know, Piracy is becoming an ever increasing problem, costing the global economy an estimated $12 Billion last year, not just in Ransom payments, but the cost of buying in Private security, increased insurance premiums and additional costs for time and fuel at sea as the ships take longer routes to try and stay out of danger. Unfortunately, the subject is the proverbial hot potato for many of the foreign governments in the affected waters and most have made it almost impossible for ships to carry armed private security contractors, so other 'less-lethal' products keep finding their way to market. BAE Systems have a system that can concentrate a three foot wide beam of bright green Laser light at a target which can temporarily blind anyone who looks at the ship and there are various 'Sound pressure wave' systems available for closer encounters, but the latest one takes the good old Pepper Spray and scales it up to another level for times when the pirates are already alongside. "The Shipboard defence System is designed with 300 gallon pressurized tanks that include loop piping installed around a vessel allowing for 100 feet of defensive zones. When activated, the system disperses a "RAINSTORM" of Mace® pepper spray that is formulated with 10% non-flammable OC pepper effective even against those with decreased sensitivity to pain. This specific Mace® formulation is also environmentally friendly as it is non-ozone depleting." Interesting idea, not sure how effective it'll be as it doesn't start working until the pirates are within RPG range, pi$$ing them off with a shower of Mace might just get your boat filled with holes before they head off to try another vessel. Read more about SDS here

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

Rep. Gabrielle Giffords Shooting

A long one, but an interesting read -Stratfor again ................................................. Following the Jan. 8 shooting of U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, Federal District Judge John McCarthy Roll and 17 others in Tucson, Arizona, discussion has focused on the motivations and ideology of the accused shooter, Jared Loughner. While it was important to make a quick assessment of Loughner’s profile in order to evaluate the possibility of an organized threat, all the available evidence (though not conclusive) indicates that he acted alone. For the most part, discussion of the event has not touched on a re-evaluation of security for members of Congress. STRATFOR has previously analyzed the issues surrounding presidential security, and while there are common concerns in protecting all branches of government, Congress and the judiciary involve much larger numbers of people — 535 representatives and senators and more than 3,000 federal judges. And members of Congress put a high priority on public accessibility, which makes them more vulnerable. A common mindset of politicians and their staffers is that better security will limit their accessibility and thus hinder their ability to do their job (and win elections). In fact, there are a number of measures that members of Congress and other public officials can institute for better security without limiting accessibility. While staying in a secure facility would be the safest, it isn’t a realistic option. What is realistic — and effective — is the prudent employment of protective intelligence as well as some measure of physical protection on the move. A Look at the Threat While there have been approximately 20 assassination attempts against U.S. presidents, four of which were successful, attacks on members of Congress and local judges are much more rare. There have been only five recorded attempts against members of the U.S. House of Representatives, including the attack on Gabrielle Giffords. And two of those five attacks resulted from disputes between representatives (one of which was a duel in 1838). But there are also many more threats voiced against public officials, which should never be ignored. The majority are issued by what we call lone wolves — individuals acting on their own rather than with a group. Communication and preparation among a group of people increases the chance of security services discovering and even infiltrating a terrorist plot, but the one-man wolf pack is much less penetrable. Their plans are made alone, they train themselves and they provide their own resources, all of which means they carry out the phases of the terrorist attack cycle with very minimal exposure to outsiders — including authorities trying to prevent such plots from maturing. The other side to lone wolves is that they often have more intent than capability. Loughner did not have the proper training or experience, for example, to carry out a major bombing or to breach a well-defended perimeter (what we call a hard target). Instead, he relied on a tactic that STRATFOR believes U.S. targets are most vulnerable to: the armed assault. Guns, and the training to use them, are readily available in the United States. The last successful armed attack carried out with political motivations occurred at Fort Hood, proving the devastating effect one man armed with a pistol can have, particularly when armed first responders are not at the scene. Many VIPs will travel in armored cars, avoid or carefully control public appearances and hire security in order to minimize the risk posed by gunmen. Members of Congress, on the other hand, are readily recognizable and often publicly available. No public official can be completely guaranteed personal security, but a great deal can be done to manage and mitigate threats, whether they are posed by lone wolves or organized groups. Protecting Public Officials While individual attackers may be able to do much of their preparation in private, their attacks — like all attacks — are most vulnerable during pre-operational surveillance. This makes countersurveillance the first step in a protective intelligence program. Most victims of a street crime, whether it’s pick-pocketing or attempted murder, report that they notice their attackers before the attack occurs. Indeed, individual situational awareness can do a lot to identify threats before they become immediately dangerous. In the case of the Giffords attack, Jared Loughner was already known by the congresswoman’s campaign staff. He had come to a previous “Congress on Your Corner†event in 2007 and asked an odd question about semantics. Loughner’s presence at one of Giffords’ public appearances before, and possibly others, left him vulnerable to identification by anyone practicing protective intelligence. The problem here was that Loughner, as far as we know, was not acting illegally, only suspiciously. However, trained countersurveillance personnel can recognize suspicious behavior that may become a direct and immediate threat. They can also disguise themselves within a crowd rather than appear as overt security, which can bring them much closer to potential perpetrators. Analysis is the second part of protective intelligence, and anyone analyzing Giffords’ security would note that serious threats were present over the last two years. In August 2009, an unknown person dropped a gun that had been concealed in his pants pocket during a town hall meeting Giffords was holding with constituents. It is unclear who the man was and whether he represented a real threat or just accidentally dropped a gun he was legally carrying, but the incident raised concern about her security. Then on March 22, her congressional office in Tucson was vandalized after a heated debate over the U.S. health care bill, which Giffords voted to support. Giffords was not the only member of Congress to confront violence last year. At least nine other lawmakers faced death threats or vandalism the week after the health care bill passed, including Rep. Tom Perriello of Virginia. An unknown individual cut a gas line for a propane tank, presumably to cause an explosion, at Perriello’s brother’s house believing it was the congressman’s residence. All 10 of the lawmakers were offered increased protection by U.S. Capitol Police, but it was not maintained. The multitude of these threats in the 2010 campaign warranted a re-evaluation of Congressional security, specifically for Giffords and the nine others who experienced violence or faced potential violence. While the vandalism and dropped gun have not been attributed to Loughner, and the Jan. 8 shooting appears to have been his first violent action, further investigation of his past could have provided clues to his intentions. After the shooting, his friends said they had noticed his hatred for Giffords, his classmates said they had observed his increasingly odd behavior and police and campus security said they had been called to deal with him on numerous occasions (for reasons that are currently unclear). Prior to the shooting, disparate bits of information from different people would not likely have been analyzed as a whole, but any one of these observed activities could have warranted further investigation by law enforcement and security agencies. Indeed, some were brought to their attention. On Dec. 13, Loughner wrote on his MySpace page “I’m ready to kill a police officer!†Tucson police or the Pima County Sheriff’s office may have investigated this threat as well as others. Sheriff Clarence Dupnik said there had already been law enforcement contacts with Loughner in which “he made threats to kill.†Protection Responsibilities The underlying story here is that threats to public officials are often apparent before an attack is made, and proactive protective intelligence can identify and address these threats. But what agency is currently responsible for protecting U.S. public officials? A little known fact is that the U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) is the agency in charge of safeguarding congressional officials not only inside the perimeter of the Capitol grounds, which includes the House and Senate office buildings and the Library of Congress, but also when those officials are traveling. The USCP has its own protection division to do just what we describe above — analyze and investigate threats against members of Congress. Based on threat assessments, this division can assign teams for countersurveillance and security whenever and wherever a representative or senator travels. The USCP is also responsible for liaison with local law enforcement in order to ensure some level of security even when there is no identifiable threat. In the case of any scheduled public appearance, protocol should require congressional staff members to notify the USCP, whose liaison unit will then alert local law enforcement, including city, county and state police, depending on the event. At this point, we don’t know why there was no police presence at Giffords’ event on Jan. 8. It appears that the event was announced the day before, according to a press release on her website. The Pima County Sheriff’s office has said it was not given prior notification of the event. In the case of federal judges like John McCarthy Roll, the U.S. Marshals Service has responsibilities similar to those of the USCP. In fact, federal marshals were assigned to Judge Roll for a month in 2010 after he received death threats. It appears that his presence at the Congress on Your Corner was not scheduled, and thus we assume he was not targeted by Loughner. Had both Giffords and Roll planned to be at the same event, the participation of two recently threatened public officials would also have warranted a security presence at the event. Security and Democracy While the U.S. president has a large, well-resourced and highly capable security service and private sector VIPs have the option of limiting contact with the public, members of Congress are somewhere in the middle. Like a presidential candidate, they want to have as much public contact as possible in order to garner support. They are also representing small, and thus very personal, districts where a local presence is seen as a cornerstone of representative democracy. Historically, in fact, the U.S. president actually received very little protection until the threat became evident in successful assassinations. Those traumatic events led the public to accept that the president should be less accessible to the public, protected by the U.S. Secret Service (which was created in 1865 originally to deal with counterfeit currency). Still, American democratic tradition dictates that members of Congress must maintain a sincere trust in the people they represent. Thus the current reaction of many in the U.S. Congress who say they will not change their activities, not add protective details and not reassess their security precautions. The concerns of becoming less accessible to the public are not unreasonable, but accessibility is not incompatible with security. We need not think of a security detail being a scrum of uniformed police officers surrounding a public official. Instead, plainclothes protective intelligence teams assigned to countersurveillance as well as physical protection can be interspersed within crowds and positioned at key vantage points, looking for threatening individuals. They are invisible to the untrained eye and do not hinder a politician’s contact with the public. Moreover, a minimal police presence can deter attackers or make them more identifiable as they become nervous and they can stop individual attackers after the first shots are fired. The assumed tradeoff between accessibility and security is in some ways a false dichotomy. There will always be inherent dangers for public officials in an uncontrolled environment, but instituting a protective intelligence program, with the aid of the USCP or other law enforcement agencies, can seriously mitigate those dangers. Read more: Congressional Security and the Tucson Shooting | STRATFOR

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

New years eve, no punches pulled, literally!

So this year i drew short straw of being in work, on a night shift new years eve. Now for all that its worth id have much rather been at home but needs must and i was required at my posting within the Comms room. The shift started off as any other, came in early at 20:30, logged onto station and checked all necessary and relevant emails and briefing items for the night ahead. The it was go time. 21:00 and Tee minus 10 hours until end of duty. Surprisingly the first few hours of shift were the usual drunken fights.arguements and thetfs but all in all it was ticking over nicely but not too busy. Then taking refreshments from midnight until 0100 allowed myself and the rest of my relief sometime to enjoy a buffet and some fireworks outside before having to get back to the hard work. As soon as i was logged back in and ready the system went wild! Beep after beep, job after job, it seemed like everyone had decided the happy new years were over and they decided they wanted to take lumps out of each other! It was a long and hard slog, weary work dealing with intoxicated persons, petty squabbles and numerous fights but it all has to be done and the police were taken to the limit that night. Clocking off at 0700 hours after a long shift, i was left feeling worn out but yet quite exhillerated with what had been done and accomplished within this singular tour of duty. Between midnight and 0700 over 3000 jobs were taken and actioned, that was within a 7 hour time frame. Some forces i know dont even do half that on any special occasions such as xmas and new years. Wearily i made my way home and went to bed, day blended to night and night again to day. It is easy to say it was a busy night but that would be an understatement. I think the Comms officers, radio personell and the officers on the street did a great job and deserve a lot more for thanks and recognition for what we did that night just to manage. Next time on this blog.... some other periodic update of life within the service

policeprospect

policeprospect

 

The New Year... etc etc

My New Year Eve.... I had the choice of: a/ spending a small fortune on getting in to a crowded nightclub, waiting ages to be served, being charged a princely sum for a small bottle of un-pronouncable beer and then get battered to death by all and sundry that attempt to pass the dance-floor b/ sit indoors watching TV on own (other half was on duty) c/ going on duty from 4pm to 2am. I chose the latter, and to be honest it wasn't as crazy as I thought it was going to be (having said that, my other half would probably argue that point) Early evening started like ground-hog day, numerous visits to the same block of apartments and communal roof-top garden where the place was teaming with 14 to 16 year olds being little blighters helped generously by lots of beer, an advert on facebook and no adults anywhere to be seen. On a subsequent visit, a parent from somewhere tracked me down, "Oi, you, I know the law...." and rambled something about confiscating alcohol on private property. My colleague went for the "breach of the peace" reply, considering they where throwing bottles of the roof top and being a royal pain in the backside. I thought of free-styling and going for an optional "S1 Young Persons Act, confiscating alcohol... public were given access... advert inviting public.... relevant place, ergo.... "hand-over yer booz sonny-jim"... but decided not to complicate the repetitive dialogue that was already open.... and maybe a bit thin on the ground... so I continued at a best attempt to patch-up the lobby door that had been disabled by someones handy work of a hammer. One hour later, back again this time criminal damage. "Well those pictures were ###### anyways" said the parent from earlier referring to the frames hanging on the communal walls that once contained pictures of oil-painted country landscapes but now just large shards of glass hang to the remains. Across the entire walls of four landings (on four different floors) in the stairwell was a streak of blood, presumably from the suspect considering the amount of skin still attached to a large shard of glass laying on the floor. I did have to stand back and admire his/her commitment to making as much mess as possible on the walls in both directions. I know if i cut my hand, my natural reaction is to stick the effected digits in to my mouth. This little oik felt the need to drag their hand across each wall, go back and do the same but in the opposite direction. Another hour later, a wet swab, a dry swab, a shard of glass with rather large amount of skin attached and off to the fridge we go. Not that there is a likelihood of the offender being know, but their DNA will sit on the database until their paths cross with the Police again. 1 week later... In the vicinity again, this time the block next door.... "my mate owes me money, I'm not going 'til he pays me" etc etc. I have a sneaky suspicion this newly developed area may become a bit familiar to me over the coming months/years. The rest of the evening when fairly consistently and stood down from duty about 3.30am. follow me on http://twitter.com/sc2522

elloelloello

elloelloello

 

Bodyguard kills Punjab Governor

The influential governor of Pakistan's Punjab province, Salman Taseer, has died after being shot by one of his bodyguards in the capital, Islamabad. Mr Taseer, a senior member of the Pakistan People's Party, was shot when getting into his car at a market. Interior Minister Rehman Malik said the guard had told police that he killed Mr Taseer because of the governor's opposition to Pakistan's blasphemy law. Many were angered by his defence of a Christian woman sentenced to death. Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani declared three days of national mourning and ordered flags lowered to half-mast. He also ordered an immediate inquiry into Mr Taseer's killing and appealed for calm. PPP supporters wept and shouted in anger as the governor's coffin was put into an ambulance and driven away from a hospital in Islamabad. Dozens took to the streets in Punjab's capital, Lahore, burning tyres and blocking traffic. There were also protests in the central city of Multan. It is the most high profile assassination in Pakistan since the killing of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, the PPP's leader, in 2007. Mr Taseer, 66, was shot repeatedly at close range by his Elite Force guard as he got into his car at the Kohsar Market, a shopping centre in Islamabad popular with Westerners and wealthy Pakistanis, Mr Malik said. "The governor fell down and the man who fired at him threw down his gun and raised both hands," Ali Imran, a witness, told the Reuters news agency. One doctor told the Associated Press that Mr Taseer was shot 26 times. The suspect was carrying a sub-machine gun. Unconfirmed reports say up to five other people were also wounded when Mr Taseer's other bodyguards opened fire following the attack. It is believed Mr Taseer had been returning to his car after meeting a friend for lunch at a nearby restaurant. He had previously been to the presidential palace, the Senate and the interior ministry. Source ............................ CP Rule #1 - Don't shoot your own Principal CP Rule #2 - Don't forget rule number 1 This is one of the few situations that you really can't plan for or mitigate against, no matter how good you or the rest of the team are...

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

Intro to blog world

Well this is the first blog for me. Ive been working for a large force in Comms now for over a year! I love every aspect of the job, the responsibility, the challenge and overall the sense of satisfaction when doing a good job. I have also learned to respect everyone of my colleagues who work to the grind, day in day out dealing with people in some of the most horrific circumstances of their life. I think it is one of the most mentally draining and challenging jobs within ourcurrent policing system. I have also encountered on numerous occasions a divide between how police fficers on the street believe we operate to how we actually do things and dealing with mr jo public at the first point of contact. I have found that most officers believe we just ask basic 5W questions and like mokeys type the info, thats not the case at all. A "simple" burglary will generally involve a minimum 12 questions throught the initial logging and this is just a basic national framework standard. Then you have to couple that with the legal knowledge of defining a burglary at first point of contact and also then giving correct relevant csiu advice etc to the MoP who will have only ever experienced a police call from watching the bill and had csiu advice from watching CSI Miami. I am always amazed and bemused to see how a police officer that comes into comms for a sit in session comes in with a "this must be an easy job attitude" to leaving wondering how the hell we do it from time to time. Now after a year i think ive been around the block and had my fair share of "doozys" from the surreal, to the unreal to the down right horrific *of which i will not go into detail" I guess the whole point of this first blog is to highlight what a specific, skilled role it is to be able to deal with people over the phone and ensure the information is right for those officers to deal with on the streets. I hope those officers and specials take on board that it is very hard to work in comms and i would emplore any officer and encourage them to take a go ToD within comms and listen in. You might be surprised! Regards

policeprospect

policeprospect

 

Official Social Networking - Facebook : http://facebook.com/SC2522 & Twitter : http://twitter.com/SC2522

So after lots and lots of emails and memos in the past reminding us about social media networking sites and how we should be carefull, I now have a facebook profile with a picture of me (taken from my attestation) in uniform, it feels really strange! No I havnt ignored all that I have been told, I am actually taking part in an official study in to social networking media and it's future in neighbourhood policing. Exciting stuff eh? The objective is to see how people respond and interact with the police online in such environments. 6 officers are taking part in the study (2x PCs, 2x Sc's and 2x PCSO's) half are using an area (such as Lewes) and half of us are using ourselves representing an area (eg Alan Thorn (me) representing Kemptown Brighton) this is guage on what level people engage with, official or on a personal level. The study will run for a minimum of 3 months and will feed directly back to the Home Office at regular intervals. Im not a huge consumer of such social media (only just started blogging) so this has been a bit of learning curve, perticularly Twitter (heard of it but never used it before). Today was Day #1 of tweeting & updating (so that the public can see what I actually do during my duty and how it affects their area) and have noticed that albeit a small number of followers that a few are way up the ladder of Sussex Police. Hopefully people will feel confident enough to start discussing issues that they have in my targeted area (Kemptown, Brighton) and of course the wider audience can become involved. There are of course a few official police facebook pages and some profiles on specialist subjects but nothing on quite such a personal level and with involvement in day-to-day policing (correct me if I am wrong). Will be very interesting to see how this is received by the public. You can visit my Facebook (and befriend me) at http://facebook.com/SC2522 and/or follow me on twitter http://twitter.com/SC2522 (apologies for the shamefull promotion in the Blog subject) Look forward to your thoughts on this.

elloelloello

elloelloello

 

A few rants about car insurance

My car insurance runs out in under two weeks time, my renewal came through and it's gone up from £324 to £522 despite me having no claims etc. I have had to set about looking for alternative car insurance, and in my quest for a more realistic price I have noticed a few strange questions on the insurance application... Are these at all relevant to my driving? You decide.... What is your marital status? Err, sorry do divorcees drive more or less dangerously than those who are in a civil partnership? What is your occupation? Come on guys, do certain occupations attract any form of discounts any more? Pah! I think not, so why ask? How many cars are there in your household? May as well as how often do I mow my lawn, as it's just as relevant... I have had 4 phone calls from insurance companies today, since I have been on a price comparison website... Aaagh!

OldGirl

OldGirl

 

Official Complaint/Holiday(San Francisco Police Dept)/BDA(2)/RPU/LST

Well, its been a little while since I've posted a blog and lots has happened.... My First Official Complaint Well it had to happen at some point (and have a feeling another one is due soon)! Rolling around on the floor with a drunk 20-something year old bloke in the high street = no complaint Pain compliance on a rather large chap trying to head-butt colleagues and myself = no complaint Arresting a farther at his family BBQ in front of his children on fathers day = no complaint Rolling around in the back of a prison van with a drug induced chappie = no complaint Palm-heal striking a very drunk and upset man who's friend (who according to him 'aint done nuthin) had been arrested late on a saturday night = no complaint Giving a seemingly educated young middle class person a ticket for failing to stop = Aggressive racist bully who spits and shouts. The reality went something like this..... While on a cycle safety awareness operation we were tasked with stopping people who went through red traffic lights (amongst other things). Now this particular person rode gingerly rode through a red traffic light a started to navigate through on-coming traffic, I asked them to stop and said "before you injure yourself can you just go back to the light and wait for it to turn green, there have been a number of accidents involving cyclists in this area and we (the police) are trying to reduce them". "I don't have time, I'm late!" came the reply. "Please can you go back to the lights, wait for it to go green then you can go on your way", "No, this is stupid, I'm very late, I don't have time". "Going through a red traffic light, even as a cyclist is an offence, I'm not going to give you a ticket but I would like you to go back to the traffic lights and wait for them to turn green.". Now, considering we were on a cycle safety operation and had a big pad of £30 tickets to dish out, I think that it was a reasonable request to make. Apparently not. As he decided to just ride off when he saw a clean break in the traffic. "STOP!" I shouted (so technically he was correct about something), he continued on his merry way. After checking no vehicles where coming I ran into the road, grabbed his cycle rack and said "Jump off please", he dismounted, "Can you join me on the pavement". I took the cycle to the pavement and lent up on some railings. "Im sorry, I tried to offer you some words of advice and asked you go back to the traffic lights and wait, you chose to ignore the request and cycle off, I asked you to stop and you continued. I cant over look this. I propose to deal with this by the means of a fixed penalty notice". The reply was "Im in a hurry I dont have time for this, there must be another way to deal with this..... (repeat several times). "Do you have any ID on you?", "No", "Anything with your name and address on?", "No", "Can you tell me your name and address please?", "No", "In order for me to give you a fixed penalty notice I require your name and address". (repeat previous verse several times). "You have committed an offence under the Road Traffic Act which I was prepared to overlook, you have committed a further offence under the Road Traffic Act by failing to stop when I required you to do so, In order for me to give you a fixed penalty notice I require your name and address, if you fail to provide me with your details I can arrest you (Im thinking I really dont want to explain this to a custody sergeant), please save yourself the embarrassment of being escorted to our police van (I pointed to it) and taking you to our custody centre." "its....... (insert name/address here), but I want your details", "No problem, they are on the ticket and I will give you a card with further details of my station and the operation we are performing today. Now, you said you are in a hurry so you may want to call someone to say you are going to be late whilst I fill out the ticket and do a quick PNC check. This will take about 10 minutes" On the ticket it asks for an ethnicity code, as with most people I show a ethnicity list (neatly stuck to the inside of my Pocket Note Book) and asked them to point to the one that bests describes their ethnicity. So, a caution, ticket, caution, explanation on when/how to pay and the bit to fill in if they wish to go to court and a neatly filled out police 'business' calling card later he was free to go on his way. 2 weeks later.... I was shown an email accusing me of violently shaking him off his bike while he merrily rode along with his iPod on, shouted at him, pushed him to the side of the road where a crowd gathered (according him the local paper turned up... tho funnily enough nothing appeared in the paper). apparently when I asked for him where he came from I muttered racist abuse and spat at him! Even though it was an absolute pile of tosh (and anyone could see through it), it still bothered me! me racist? violent? Luckily I was double crewed and my crew partner was only 20ft away. After he met with my sergeant and Inspector (that kind of accusation would never be ignored) it was all dropped. Funnily enough (or not) I gave out another ticket the other day when I was on foot patrol and member of public complained that a vehicle was park right across the footpath and they couldn't get by. I walked up and after 10 minutes of trying to locate the owner I decided to start writing out a ticket.... as if by magic the owner appeared out of a nearby shop. I mentioned not only was it parked over double yellow lines it was also parked right across pathway and that someone had complained to me that they had to walk in the road to get round. They seamed to dis-agree with this (I failed to see how they could, after all the vehicle was parked 2ft to my left). Another request for my number and reminder that I will be hearing more about it. Hmmmm, I think I will just stick to rolling around on the floor with drunken/drugged people while being filmed on a mobile phone which uploads directly to youtube...... no complaints ever seem to come of those! Holidays For my boyfriends birthday we took a holiday round the states (New York, Washington, Orlando, Las Vegas and San Francisco). As a treat (after a bit of co-ordination from my sergeant and a kind person on response) we met up with a sergeant 'Chuck' in the San Francisco Police Department and a ex-pat who is a serving officer in the SFPD. We turned up at the precinct and got a tour and met a number of high up people (I got lost in the rank structure). Now I dont know what I was expecting, but I guess it was largly based on all those American Cop TV shows that on the back channels of Sky TV. In a number of ways, its no different to our police stations are organized with an exception to: Briefing : Consists of standing in front of a large cork-board before starting duty Amenities : Huge TV room, gym and canteen. Cells : Two large rooms for multi-occupancy with a large chrome rail to handcuff your detainees to. Armory : A big room with lots of guns of all types and sizes. As you can imagine the armory was a source of much interest. It was explained while we stood in the centre of the room "When an officer comes to work he has his side-arm with him (the handgun), he then comes in here and checks-out a shot-gun, a tazer (looks like another shot-gun, wicked stuff) and a tactical rifle". Now I thought my utility belt was full!!! Where and why? Well, apparently its all needed. The side-arm (utility belt) for those ad-hoc moments when you need to pop-a-cap in someone's ass. The shotgun (front of the car) for general purpose destruction, the tazer (trunk of the car) if you're a panzy and dont wish to spray the public standing close by with someone's intestines and a tactical rifle (trunk of the car) for those moments when suspect has an AK-47 or has body armor (apparently it happens alot). "So? is it true you guys just have a stick?" came the question. "Yes, we all live in castles and cannons are a real nightmare to carry around". The one thing that struck me was that just like our section police rooms, the walls are covered with 'nominals', known persons who cause a large percentage of the local headaches, except these are dived into gangs..... oh and instead of 9 or 10 badly photocopied pictures they have about 150! Chuck and his partner (and the SFPD who largely footed the hospitality bill) took us to lunch in the Castro and a few evenings of getting to know the local area (mainly viewed from restaurants and bars). Cant wait to go back! BDA (Basic Driving Authority) - Prison Vans and People Carriers Because Im so old and can drive pretty much anything (except busses and trucks). Taking advantage of this I took another driving test so that I can drive the big police prison vans and the people carriers/mini-buses. I expected (as per my car test) to potter around for half an hour while chatting about random things. Not quite so. Its been about 8 years since I have driven anything larger than a mid-size saloon car so taking two steps up in to a chuffing great van (that we had to borrow from LST as its not very often anyone is taught these things) I realised it probably wasnt going to be quite the same as my car BDA test. After plowing my way through Lewes traffic, reversing a few times, parking etc etc we headed back to HQ. "Now park it in there" my instructor pointed to a space between two other vans that only looked large enough park a motorcycle. I lined it up and gingerly reversed the huge lump of metal between the two vans, pulled my wing mirrors in so that it would fit. Opened my door and slinked out in the tiny gap between the vehicles (im pretty slim), maneuvered myself under the folded wing mirrors and took a look back. There must of been about 10 inches either side to spare. "Hmmmm, not bad, could have been better" remarked my instructor! Anyways, I passed and was told I should apply for the 'standard' course (blues and sirens) as I had good potential (I may have reminded a few people of this since). RPU (Road Policing Unit, aka Traffic Cops/Black Rats) I recently spent two days with RPU, which largely consisted of tapping in car registration numbers in the MDT (Mobile Data Terminal) in the vehicle using a dodgy wireless keyboard that had a several keys missing (We had ANPR (Automatic Number Plate Recognition) but it was so slow it was easier to do it manually) I gave out more tickets in 2 days than I have done in the past 12 months (no complaints as yet). It was quite mundane if im honest and we secretly wished for dodgy wet weather so we could attend an RTC (Road Traffic Collision). The team were really nice though. LST (Local Support Team aka 'The Door Boshers') Two whole days filled with over-flowing testosterone. I attended two raids and a demonstration (although I personally I wouldn't have called it a demonstration, more like a few people that were a bit cheesed off). Again, a great bunch of people who took the time to explain things to me in great detail. It was a good experience. Cant wait for my attachment with the Dog Unit next month (I've been told I shouldn't pat the dog and tell him he's cute, something to do with ripping my face off). I'll let you know how it goes :S

elloelloello

elloelloello

 

Jenson Button saved by Security Driver

Jenson Button escaped unharmed following an armed attack on the car carrying the reigning Formula One world champion and his father John away from the Interlagos circuit in São Paulo. Button's manager, Richard Goddard, and trainer, Mike Collier, were also in the vehicle when the incident occurred after qualifying for the Brazilian Grand Prix. The 30-year-old, being chauffeured in an armoured vehicle with a police driver at the helm, managed to escape the assailants. A statement issued by Button's McLaren team read: "On Saturday evening on the way back from the Interlagos circuit armed would-be assailants made an attempt to approach the car that was carrying Jenson Button. "Neither Jenson nor the other occupants of the car were hurt. The other occupants were John Button [Jenson's father], Mike Collier [Jenson's physio] and Richard Goddard [Jenson's manager]. "McLaren Mercedes had provided both Jenson and team-mate Lewis Hamilton with reinforced armoured vehicles driven by police drivers, who had been trained in avoidance techniques and were armed. "The police driver of Jenson's vehicle reacted swiftly and, using avoidance techniques, rapidly forced his way through the traffic, taking Jenson and the other occupants of the car immediately away from any danger and back to their hotel. "The São Paulo authorities have also acted efficiently and will be providing additional security to transfer Jenson and other senior McLaren personnel to the Interlagos circuit for the race." Source ......................................................... Well done to the Security Driver, great reaction and skills. It's not just a case of floor it and get out of there though, the driver will have positioned the car on the road to give him room to react and get the car out if anything did happen. Staying observant to potential threats, keeping an escape route/plan always in your head and keeping constant look-out for where you can go in a hurry, leaving room to the car in front so you can maneuver all make a massive difference, then using enough force to push through cars in your way without disabling your vehicle are also major considerations, although having an armoured Mercedes obviously helps a little too

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

Has anyone a copy of the Cartoon in Police Review

Has anyone a copy of the cartoon from the October fed police review mag - page 9 could it be scannned and forwarded onto me at nigel@nkettlewell.freeserve.co.uk I have been told it is a little derogatory towards Special Constables & could do with a copy - I hear they are going to print an apology in November's mag.

NKett

NKett

 

9/11

When people think of 9/11, they think of the towers. The buildings, the planes and the culprits. Rarely do they endeavour into the personal level. Read about 1 of the nearly 3,000 people whose lives were lost, the fathers, the mothers, the daughters, the sons, the uncles and aunties. They mean no disrespect, grief for the event is collective and they cannot possibly grieve for each victim and the gap they leave behind. There is one thing I think is disrespectful, and that is conspiracy theorists. They question whether the United States Government of the time deliberately harmed and killed it's own people. They're inconsiderate pigs who refer to anyone who believes the official line of events as a sheep, whereas they are always quoting their 'truth' movement as growing, so tell me - why is it not following the herd to believe in a theory dreamt up by a 19 year old liar? Conspiracy theorists forget that these events (usually 9/11, 7/7 and the like) involve people. They turn up to memorials spouting their opinions based on their personal grievances against the system of government without a second's thought to the feelings of the victim's families. They implied that the police, fire and EMS were all involved on one 9/11 memorial without caring that nearly 500 emergency service workers died on 9/11, and many more died in the years following from exposure to the debris. Conspiracy crackpots are insecure children who are rude, inconsiderate and disgusting. They need stopping but they cannot be stopped. I'll return to my main point as I did get sidetracked there, people forget the human side. One thing that I believe humanises it are the phone calls from the towers. People trapped above the impact zone's calls for help and final words to 911 or their loved ones. Listening to the phone calls makes it seem real, and less like an event and more like a tragic loss of life. God Bless.

MindTheGap

MindTheGap

 

24/10/10- yet another day

Well this is my first steps on this "blog" thing so bare with me. Well I lost my job on the 1/09/10 so I've been out of work for about 2 months after working full time for 3 years and I think I am going crazy. Most days just flow into the next and the next and before I know it there goes another week and I haven't do alot, I am finding it hard to motivate myself to do anything Theres not much of anything on the job front at the minute so having to sign on down at the job centre and to top it all off I've managed to put on the weight I lost to get into the specials My only light at the end of the tunnel is that I come out of training on the Dec 5th for just over a month to go and I can start My plan for next week is that I am going to start back at the gym and hope this will help me to get motivated before I go out on the beat.

SEADOG

SEADOG

 

Karzai seeing sense or paid off?

Further to my "What is Karzai up to?" blog post, he's started to back down already - I wonder if this involved large deposits into Swiss Bank accounts or people pointing out the implications of a mass exodus of westerners... KABUL — The Afghan government Sunday rolled back its plan to disband all private security firms, declaring that those protecting embassies and military bases could maintain those operations in the country. President Hamid Karzai's office said firms "providing security for embassies, transport of diplomats, diplomatic residences, international forces' bases and depots can continue operation within these limits". Karzai in August ordered that all private security contractors operating in the country, both Afghan and international, must cease operations by January 1, 2011. The decree led to widespread concern that the deadline was too tight to find alternatives amid a deteriorating security situation, and fears that some diplomats and private companies would be forced to leave Afghanistan. While the measure received widespread support in principle, diplomats, military officials and private security contractors have said Karzai's government has been under intense pressure to reconsider the blanket ban. In a brief statement Sunday, Karzai's office said that "concerns expressed by NATO commanders and foreign embassies about the dissolution of private security companies" had been considered. Firms not involved in military or diplomatic security would be dissolved as planned, it said. "Other private security companies pose a serious threat to internal security and national sovereignty, and the dissolution process will continue with no exception," the statement said. Afghan officials have said that more than 50 private security firms, about half of them Afghan, employ tens of thousands of armed personnel across the country. Following the collapse of the Taliban regime in a 2001 US-led invasion, private security firms rushed in to fill a vacuum created by a lack of adequately trained police and army forces. In 2006 the Afghan authorities began registering, regulating and licensing the firms but there have been questions about the activities of some. The firms provide security to the international forces, the Pentagon, the UN mission, aid and non-governmental organizations, embassies and Western media companies in Afghanistan. But Afghans criticize the private security forces as overbearing and abusive, notably on the country's roads.

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

Day out with the Boss

Last week saw me on a 'day trip' with the boss to Glasgow. Interestingly, there was another 'VIP' on the train on the way there and I have to say I don't know where his protection learnt their trade but I suspect Bozo the Clown was team leader. It was a pretty simple, low-key trip up north for us; a short hop from Manchester to Preston before picking up the Virgin Express out of London to complete the journey to Glasgow. Not much planning required for the travel and not too many variables to worry about, we'd be stuck on the train for the duration so just two guys in suits on a business trip, low profile all the way. Usual stuff like a lift to Manchester Piccadilly sorted; no walk across town and avoids needing to leave a car parked unattended while we're away, tickets booked in advance and seats reserved etc and we'd be collected at the other end to go to the meeting. The short hop went nicely but I knew something odd was going on as soon as we boarded the Virgin train at Preston - aggressive looking chaps with curly wires behind their ears staring menacingly at everyone who boarded and making dicks of themselves when people wanted to walk past the principal, who had taken up position at a table right in the middle of the carriage (so there would be traffic past him throughout the journey, not a good choice with security that edgy) My boss smiled at me, both thinking this would be fun to watch but it also took the pressure off me - they would be acting as extra eyes for me because anyone dodgy-looking heading in our direction had to get past them first… The circus continued for a couple hours, lots of attention from people on them, nothing on us, lots of testosterone floating about and uncomfortable moments although to be fair the other team lightened up a bit towards the end, I guess they were finally happy nobody from AQ was on the train. They stayed where they were when we pulled in to Glasgow, wanting to leave last with a clear carriage I guess but I couldn't help flashing my SIA CP card to the TL as we passed and thanked him for the entertainment Didn't really figure out the need for the comms, although I don't know where they were going later (but they could have kitted up just before the train arrived in station) but they kept exchanging short phrases with each other throughout the journey, even though they were within 15 feet of each other most of the time - I wouldn't have been surprised if they had other guys throughout the rest of the train too, God knows why I'd have liked to have watched them convey the Principal across the station but we were pushed for time so we headed out like businessman and PA and got on with the day. They were not on the return journey and the train was pretty empty so I got to relax a bit while the boss hammered his Blackberry keyboard to death.

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

Charles' bodyguard collapses in flight to Commonwealth Games

Prince Charles was involved in a mid-air medical emergency when his security chief suffered a heart attack on the royal plane to India. Superintendent Tim Nash collapsed during the private flight from London to Delhi last Saturday, just yards from where Charles and his brother Prince Edward were sitting. It meant the heir to the throne was left to carry out a high-risk four-day tour of India without his most senior protection officer Charles's personal doctor treated the senior Scotland Yard officer as the royals were kept abreast of the 'traumatic' situation.His condition was deemed so serious that aides feared the plane – part of the Queen's Flight – would have to make an emergency landing. But the chartered aircraft, which is believed to have been nearing the end of its eight-hour journey, was able to touch down in Delhi at 1.35pm, where it was met by paramedics. Mr Nash is still recovering in hospital, leaving the rest of his team to protect Charles during the Commonwealth Games. A source said: ‘Tim had a massive heart attack and it was very touch and go – they thought he was at death’s door. ‘His career may be effectively finished – he may not be able ever to go back to work.’ Clarence House declined to comment.

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

Queen's top bodyguard suspended for firing shot in palace

Chief Superintendent Ian Boyes was cleaning his loaded gun when it went off inside Holyroodhouse, the monarch’s official residence in Edinburgh. The accident occurred on September 16, just hours before the Pope arrived to meet the Queen. It is not known if Her Majesty was inside the palace when the shot was fired. Chief Supt Boyes, who is SAS-trained and vastly experienced in Royal protection, was not harmed in the accident, which occurred when he was alone and off-duty at the time. But he was promptly removed from firearms duty while an internal investigation was carried out. It is the first time so senior an officer has been suspended over such an incident. Chief Supt Boyes has been the Queen’s last line of defence for a decade and guarded her throughout the Golden Jubilee celebrations in 2002. He was made a Member of the Royal Victorian Order in 2005 for his services to the Royal and Diplomatic Protection Department. The chief protection officer has since been reinstated after undergoing retraining in the safe handling of firearms. Buckingham Palace and Scotland Yard last night sought to play down the incident as a "non-issue." A spokeswoman for the Palace said: "He was only suspended from the firearms part of his duty and he retook the firearms test and is now back on duty. That’s just standard procedure. It was an accident. There’s no issue with it really." A Scotland Yard spokesman said: "As is routine in this type of incident, the officer was removed from firearms duty and an internal inquiry undertaken. The officer has completed the re-accreditation process and has resumed firearms duty." In 2000, PC Michael Slade, 59, accidentally fired two shots on the Royal train as the Queen slept nearby. Six years earlier, royal bodyguard Des Stout had accidentally shot himself in the leg during a routine practice. Royal bodyguards favour the Austrian Glock 19, calibre 9 mm, which is relatively easy to use but has limited safety features Source .............................................. Ooops, can't imagine how he missed the round still in the chamber but there you go...

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

Unofficial Contractors Creed

This is doing the rounds and is pretty much as factual as it is funny Contractors Creed (Iraq etc) I am a UK contractor. I look out for myself, the operators to my left and right, and no one else. I will always take advantage of the fact that I can finally tell military officers to kiss my behind, and will do so at every opportunity. I am my country's scapegoat, the "plausible deniability" warrior, and I love it. Less than £250 a day is unacceptable. I am trained to eat things that would make a goat puke I care not for medals and awards for valour. I do this job for the opportunity to kill the enemies of my country, and to finally get that car I've always wanted. I will be in better shape than 99% of the active duty personnel, although this is not hard. I will equip myself with the latest high speed gear, and will trick out my M4 until it weighs more than 24 lbs, not because it works better, but because it looks cool in the photographs. I will carry more weapons, ammunition, and implements of death on my person than an entire infantry fire team, and when engaged I will lay waste to everything around me. In any combat zone, I will always locate the swimming pool, beer, and women first, because I can. I will deploy on my terms, and if it ever gets too stupid, I will simply find another company that pays me more

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

My First Entry...

Well I'm new to all this blog stuff but have decided it's time to catch up and take part and what better way to do it than to do one about my Special Constable Application? ------------------------------ Well it all started back in the January of 2010. I sent my application off and I recieved a confirmation email on the 23rd January, it was on the :D26th that I recieved an email inviting me to the Assessment Centre at Six Hills Court on the 13th February. It was at this point I became extremely nervous. I'd never really sat anything like this before so read the documents that were attched with the email over and over and over!! Very quickly, the 13th February arrived and what a great start to the day, got onto the A1m and was greated by stand still traffic, rang the number that they gave and said to ring with any problems and explained I would be late due to this, my heart was soon put to rest when they told me they were aware of what was happening with the motorway and that there were about 5/6 other people with the same issue, phew! Skipping all the boring parts and getting to the main part, it was when I got home that I saw the email saying I'd passed the Assessment Centre stage, WIN! Unfortunately, it was at this point the whole process went down hill, I developed an injurt with my knee which I knew would cause me problems but also had things like trying to source a new job going on which put my application further back, infact, my application was put back around 3 times until I was finally able to tell Recruitment I was all sorted and able to continue! The next step was my fitness test, this was booked for the 1st July and I passed this also! It wasn't as hard as I thought it would be, infact it was near enough the same as to what I'd done on the Public Service Course I did at College. I never did recieve a confirmation of passing this but we all got told on the day which was quite nice, was only a small group of us also A month after passing my fitness test, I got a call from Ocupational Health asking me about my on going knee Injury, this again, was the point it took another drop down hill! So off to my GP I went to get a letter confirming my knee wouldn't cause me any issues whilst on Duty. He did a check up on my knee, spoke to my Physiotherapist and the letter was signed The knee injurt is still there but it's got a lot better and it now wont cause me any issues! So my Medical was booked for the 16th September at 9am which again, I passed!! All going well so far! Got home and an email from Recruitment telling me I'd passed, and an invite to another fitness test because the last one is outside the 8 week border before a start date. I was kind of annoyed at this but then after some of the kind members on here explaining why, I accepted it and also realised that I've done it once, I can do it again. It was in the same email I was given a provisional start date of the 6th November. Assessment Centre - Passed 13th February Vetting - Passed? Never recieved confirmation of this but given a start date and lady at OHU said it would mean I had? Fitness Test - Passed 1st July Medical - Passed 16th September Fitness Test 2 - ....... 23rd September Provisional Start Date - 6th November Sorry it was so long, but this now means I have a complete blog of my process so far! I'm off for some coffee....

SC Ben

SC Ben

 

Jaguar XJ Sentinel

Anyone notice how low the Pope had to duck down, to get in the back of the new Jag? This is the first time I've seen the new XJ "Sentinel" on a job and I have to say it looks very nice. You can read a bit about it on Jaguar's Armoured Page linked below XJ Sentinel The protection level is B7 (the highest currently available without compromising the vehicle's looks and turning it into a 'tank'), which is the next one up from the usual Hard Range Rover that follows various official VIPs and Royalty about and extends protection to cover 7.62 'armour piercing' rounds fired from long-barrel sniper rifles and provide a higher level of blast protection too. Notice the pale coloured 'protrusion' that extends down below the door seal below the roof? That's the ballistic steel liner that overlaps with an extended door frame and window surround (notice the extensive black section covering the top third of the window). The weakest points of any armour are where two protective panels meet, and if one of those hinges open too, you have the potential for a bullet or shrapnel to pass through to the inside, either directly or via ricochet. To combat this you overlap one with the other, in such a way that you don't have a direct route inside, regardless of which direction the round is travelling in.

MrBlonde

MrBlonde

 

Basic Driving Authority (BDA) Test - Car

What a month its been since my last blog! Lots and lots of patrol! Since gaining IP (Independant Patrol) status it's been nice taking the occasional walk on my own and also crewing with various PCSO's (they do a great job, they are the knowledge bank of who's who of the majority of the local tear-aways ner-do-wells). So the next step... getting behind the wheel of a police car. I spent several evenings before my test revising the highway code, learning my thinking and breaking distances! On the morning I turn up at HQ and sit my theory test (40 multiple choice questions, requiring a pass mark of 36 out of 40) and then jumped into an un-marked family sized saloon diesel with my examiner. 20 minutes of 29mph ten-to-two driving/steering and hand-feed turning, a bit of reversing round corners and polite chatter and hey presto, a yellow sheet of paper and a red-permit in the post! Next month, its my BDA test for the people carriers/vans. Have a sneaky suspicion it may be a bit more difficult to reverse round a corner! i'll let you know!

elloelloello

elloelloello