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Walking the dog


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#1 RyanF109

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 02:33 AM

I have started taking my dog (A 1 and a bit year old female working cocker spaniel) out regularly. She refuses to accept the fact that she is on a lead and pulls as hard as she can, and she's very strong!

She is starting to behave a bit better when there's no distractions such as my younger brother who she always plays with. I started saying "Walk nice" and praising her when she doesn't tug. I even had her "Walking nice" off the lead beside me!

However this is only when she feels like it, and all I can do is keep praising her for doing the right thing, I also have developed saying "ah ah ah!" or "Tsh!" or "KIM!!!!" when she starts tugging or going ahead of me, sometimes she realises this means no (since "No Kim" falls on deaf ears) :unsure:

Am I doing the right things? And after she learns to walk is it too late to teach her other things such as fetching (she chases stuff, but doesn't pick it up, and if she does she won't give it back, she runs away)? Is it ever too late to teach a dog new things?

#2 Alexis050891

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 02:54 AM

:unsure: that is spooky. Someone with my name in my country with a dog with the same name as mine(my dog, I'm not called Kim) :p

You are doing the right stuff. It's what I do with my dog. Just keep up the consistency and Kim should mature with age like a good single malt.
I'd think at 1 year old your dog should be OK learning new stuff.

#3 David

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 06:07 AM

Yep keep it up. She will learn and will come into line.

#4 markie b

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 07:00 AM

i got a rough collie about the same age one thing i will say is praise them when theyre good and give them a telling off when theyre bad.

if you take the lead with both hands and have it so she is walking beside you and doesnt have the slack there to be able to go further then she will learn to stay beside you.when she is distracted by something tug the lead sharply it breaks their focus on the object.

dogs at this age are pretty much like 8-12 year olds theyre going to push your luck tell them 1 time and one time only as this if not followed can be bad as the more times you have to repeat yourself the more times then get used to you saying the word till it eventually falls upon deaf ears so say 1 time then wait if they dont do what you ask then show them ie sit if she doesnt sit plonk her butt on the ground.
heal is a great one for when you stop take the slack on the lead when the dog is sat infront take one step back and as you do say heal pulling the lead with you have a treat in the other hand and follow it around your back make sure she see's it but doesnt get it untill she is right the way around and sat back down again.

to get a dog to come to you firstly hold a treat in the hand you want them to come and sit at let them see the treat in your hand but then close it up say sit and hold your arm up and straight out if the dog just sits right infont of you shake your hand a little so she moves to the side where your arm is held up do this several times at home and associate it with a noise like a whistle when she has properly learnt in about 2 weeks after everyday doing this then she will eventually recognise the noise and see your arm held up when you take her for walkies and come running back to you and sit infront by which ever side you choose her to waiting for her treat.

treats are a great way to get a dog to follow orders especially at that age but only do it as a reward do it all the time and they expect them all the time.

#5 mymumalwayssaidiwasspecial

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 07:33 AM

I have a two year old Cavalier that I found on my way home from work a couple of years ago.

When I took him to puppy classes he nearly gave the woman a nervous breakdown. She eventually took me to one side and said that he is untrainable! Something to do with his skull being too small for his brain!

He is a lovely dog but he does pull when he's being walked but if I run with him he settles down nicely after five minutes.

#6 markie b

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 07:55 AM

I have a two year old Cavalier that I found on my way home from work a couple of years ago.

When I took him to puppy classes he nearly gave the woman a nervous breakdown. She eventually took me to one side and said that he is untrainable! Something to do with his skull being too small for his brain!

He is a lovely dog but he does pull when he's being walked but if I run with him he settles down nicely after five minutes.


thats because a well exersized is a happy compliant dog they just end up bored if they dont get to much exersise and will pull to begin with just keep the leash short and hold it one hand taking up the slack the dogs side hand should keep it tightish so the dog gets used to walking beside you.
theres no such thing as a bad dog just bad owners and any dog can be trained just need the right method of training for that particular breed.
ie a retriever will retrieve and hunt (usually)
a sheep dog will like more mental challanges
a jack russell just needs lots of posties to yap at :unsure:

#7 goldie

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 11:53 AM

I find that when my lab pulls if I turn round and walk a few paces back in the direction I came from that usually does the trick. He soon gets fed up going no where fast. I do have a problem getting him to bring a ball back. He will go and fetch it and then drop it about 20 feet away from you and then come to you and walk with you to get it. I have tried ignoring him but we both end up standing there indefinitely, giving him a treat if he brings it back but he isn't interested in getting a treat and calling him back while he has the ball but that doesn't work either as he drops the ball and comes back to you without it. Any ideas?

#8 DrMax

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 12:29 PM

keep him close at heel and if he starts to pull then jerk the lead and stop (with a stop command). If necessary get him to sit and don't move on until he has complied (treats are a good incentive). Move on with a clear command but keep him at heel. Repeat until until you can walk without the pulling.

It takes time and the smarter the dog the faster the training (mine's not really bright and needs lots of direction)

Of course an excited dog will tend to pull and this has more to do with him not getting bored when not out walking. It's a balance, but you'll see results. Trick is to be consistent.
Good luck :unsure:

#9 Lone Wolf

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 01:21 PM

I had a labrador once, and she behaved like this from the moment she was on a lead pretty much until the day she died. I'm not trying to say she'll never learn, since labradors are supposedly the most disobedient of dogs.

Shouting seemed to only make her worse. A dog psychologist would probably say that it does not understand verbal chastisement, but rather sees you as another pack member barking and only wants to participate.

#10 markie b

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 02:41 PM

I had a labrador once, and she behaved like this from the moment she was on a lead pretty much until the day she died. I'm not trying to say she'll never learn, since labradors are supposedly the most disobedient of dogs.

Shouting seemed to only make her worse. A dog psychologist would probably say that it does not understand verbal chastisement, but rather sees you as another pack member barking and only wants to participate.


if this is the case become the lead pack member all animal packs have a leader use your authorative training on the dog.shouting wont work but a raised hacked off voice does.when you walk in when you get home ignore the dog kiss the misses hubby what ever make a cuppa take your shoes off get comfy then acknowledge the dog by acknowledging the dog first (labradors are hard to ignor coz they weigh a ton)they think they have presedent over anyone else as they are the one who is always acknowledged first

try standing infront of her put your hands behind your back and look forwards and say sit my sisters lab when i put my hands behind my back doesnt even need telling anymore she walks upto me and sits same as when im out i hold a arm up she comes running back and sits which ever side i raise my sister doesnt bother with the training and i only see cara every 6 months or so but she still remembers.

Edited by David, 19 August 2009 - 05:18 PM.
Disguised naughty word sanitised - naughty naughty


#11 prolixia

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 03:12 PM

I also have developed saying "ah ah ah!" or "Tsh!" or "KIM!!!!" when she starts tugging or going ahead of me


I was always told to avoid using a dog's name to chastise it, because you want to create a positive association so that it comes when it's called. I know it probably really has more to do with the tone of voice, but anyway that's what I was told.

#12 Vampyre

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 04:56 PM

Each dog is slightly different in what will acheive results, one of mine is food obsessed and will do anything to earn a treat, the other just wants his ball. Once you find out what the biggest reward they can get is, it becomes easier to give motivation to the dog. I would say that your best bet is either take her to classes, or get a decent book and stick to it. Training a dog can be hard work, and sometimes very frustrating, but once done properly, you will have a much happier relationship with your dog.
As far as pulling on the lead goes, she wants to go first, simples!
To stop this, I have found that as soon as the lead goes tight, sharply turn around and walk back the way you have come for about 6 -10 paces. This should give a short sharp tug on the lead and force the dog to come with you(dogs are much tougher than you think, so don't worry too much). After a few paces stop and get the dog to sit beside your foot, once it does, praise it. You can then start walking forwards, if she walks to heel, praise her. As soon as the pull starts, repeat the whole thing. It will seem a little silly, but after about 10 minutes you will probably see an improvement. Gradually, you will find that the turns won't be required, just a sharp tug on the lead will bring her back to heel. A short command such as "heel" is better than "walk nice" I find.
It's all about dominance, once you've established that, it's easy! Don't bother trying to engage in a tug of war situation, you'll end up losing.

#13 WT

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 07:11 PM

I've got a Cavalier King Charles female, coming up to a year old next month. I've just started letting her off the lead in the park, only when there are other dogs or people not around. She loses concentration and chases anything, including butterflys! I find that i have the same problem with regard to the tugging, especially near busy main roads...she acts like she wants to run after cars and probably does. So, you aren't the only one mate!

#14 RyanF109

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 01:43 AM

Thanks a lot for the replies, much appreciated.

#15 HuskyMusky

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 09:40 AM

Invest in a Halti

http://www.caninecon...d-Collar--halti

I got one for my 3 year old german shepherd (rescue) and he is ridiculously strong. Got one of these babys and its like hes not even on his lead. Dont be thrown off by the around the mouth fixture, still can pant,eat,bark like before.



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