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#1 Frogman

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 05:31 PM

My parents #####ztu dog is almost 6 months old. They have dedicated a lot of time to his training and are doing exremely well.

From day one, he has slept in a crate/pen in the kitchen. At first, he was locked in his pen but after becoming quite confident that his toilet training was progressing nicely, we started leaving it open for him during the night to have access to a cool laminate floor and water etc.

Recently he's started whimpering and crying when the folks go to bed about 11.30pm (just like the first few days he was brought home to their house). The first time he did this, we put it down to an eventful day where he was quite busy and slept most of the afternoon and then came fully awake late at night. This recent time, he's had little sleep during the day and should have been ready for a good nights sleep yet my folks went to bed and he was scratching the door until such time they couldnt take anymore and had to go downstairs and lock him in his pen for the night - he cried for a few minutes but then went to sleep.

So why has he been so good for 6 months and now started whimpering like he did when he first went to live with them?

Any ideas folks, and more importantly, what should they do or is this normal?

#2 PandaRenegade

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 06:27 PM

My parents #####ztu dog is almost 6 months old. They have dedicated a lot of time to his training and are doing exremely well.

From day one, he has slept in a crate/pen in the kitchen. At first, he was locked in his pen but after becoming quite confident that his toilet training was progressing nicely, we started leaving it open for him during the night to have access to a cool laminate floor and water etc.

Recently he's started whimpering and crying when the folks go to bed about 11.30pm (just like the first few days he was brought home to their house). The first time he did this, we put it down to an eventful day where he was quite busy and slept most of the afternoon and then came fully awake late at night. This recent time, he's had little sleep during the day and should have been ready for a good nights sleep yet my folks went to bed and he was scratching the door until such time they couldnt take anymore and had to go downstairs and lock him in his pen for the night - he cried for a few minutes but then went to sleep.

So why has he been so good for 6 months and now started whimpering like he did when he first went to live with them?

Any ideas folks, and more importantly, what should they do or is this normal?


Frogman, I'm not a dog trainer but have read up a lot on dog training and dog behaviour when trying to rehome various rescue dogs.

Dependant on how the relationships and bonds have developed with your parents may be down to this behaviour. At first the dog was not relying on your parents as part of the pack (if that makes sense) but as time has gone on, the dog has began to rely on your parents as part of his pack and so he relies on them for protection etc and so this may be a reason for his behaviour.

My advice would be to walk him for a considerable time to completly tire him out just before bed and this should make him nod off almost instantly. It should be a case of walking him and then once home, putting him in his bed and assisting him in dropping off. A good tip is to gently stroke the dogs ear. If they're exhausted enough, it should work. It if doesn't the first time, just walk him / her for longer the following night!

Good luck

#3 Dick Dastardly

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:23 AM

Frogman,

Don't be too concerned about this way the pup is. They simply want to be with whoever they have bonded with! The whimpering is just a signal to attract your attention.

Listen to how long it carries on for, a few minutes.....or is it longer? Mostly it depends on how patient/tolerant you are, but if the pup settles after 10/15 mins......you should be ok. Any longer, I would be investigating, reassuring, saying NO and then retrying.......

My Springer was just the same, and at nearly 3, he still whinges/grumbles when put to bed, but I understand his habits.

Hope it helps, good luck.

#4 -AJ

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 09:19 AM

My dog is 3. She goes to bed happily all the time, she gets all happy and wags her tail when told it's 'bedtime. However when she is 'in season' she has a tendency to whine for the first 20 mins or so for some reason -

doesn't help you much I guess but i guess it shows even the best behaved dogs have their odd moments?

#5 Frogman

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Posted 05 August 2009 - 06:18 PM

My advice would be to walk him for a considerable time to completly tire him out just before bed and this should make him nod off almost instantly. It should be a case of walking him and then once home, putting him in his bed and assisting him in dropping off. A good tip is to gently stroke the dogs ear. If they're exhausted enough, it should work. It if doesn't the first time, just walk him / her for longer the following night!

Good luck


Cheers! He is walked every day but we are told (by a local dog trainer) not to walk him too far as his bones are still very young and small (15 minutes a day). Thanks though, I'll try the ear thing, i think it worked before :p

Listen to how long it carries on for, a few minutes.....or is it longer? Mostly it depends on how patient/tolerant you are, but if the pup settles after 10/15 mins......you should be ok. Any longer, I would be investigating, reassuring, saying NO and then retrying.......


Thanks Dick, when they first had him, it was all night which then settled to about 5-10 minutes after they went upstairs. Its been nothing until recently where at first he cried for hours! Then after the 2-3 nights, it was minutes before he managed to settle. Thankfully, my mum is stern and believes that how cruel it may seem, he does now know that whimpering doesn't get him attention anymore than my mum or dad coming downstairs and saying NO! Just like you said. Thankfully, he has settled again now and hopefully, he's starting to learn ;)

My dog is 3. She goes to bed happily all the time, she gets all happy and wags her tail when told it's 'bedtime. However when she is 'in season' she has a tendency to whine for the first 20 mins or so for some reason -

doesn't help you much I guess but i guess it shows even the best behaved dogs have their odd moments?


They sure do! I'm hoping this was just a blip and he's back to normal again!!!!

Thanks for your replies guys :unsure:

#6 Doghandler2009

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 04:15 PM

I have just brought home a 8 week old german shepard pup and you would not belive something so small could make so much noise so i know how you feel most of all they just need routine the first week we locked her in the back alley near the utility room and she cried for hours but within a week she now just has a few mins of wimpering and i am sure that very soon this will stop.
The temptation to go and see her give her a cuddle etc is extreme but had dogs for years and if you go and give them any responce it just carries on for longer i agree sometimes you do have to be cruel to be kind

best of luck hope it stops soon for you

#7 Pineappleman

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Posted 06 September 2009 - 01:26 PM

I have had my German shepard from 8 weeks. And he sleeps in his crate with no problems. What we did was make it his space away from the stress of kids,and home life, you could call it his chill out space.

What i would suggest is to make it a place he/she loves, try feeding him/her there and he/she will soon think of it as a nice space that they will gladly go to.

Dont forget that a dog is a pack animal so being left alone is not something they will like whining and noise will be part of the parcle of a pup.

here is some info i found on the net for you.

Step One - Nothing to Fear Here:
Bring your crate home.
Leave it somewhere so your dog can investigate it at her leisure for a couple of days with the door removed. If your dog is extremely skittish, you might want to try removing the top half if you are using a plastic airline kennel.

If she shows no signs of curiosity, try leaving her favorite treats inside it or a favorite toy. If you have to, coax her in using irresistible treats, or when all else fails (and the crate is big enough), climb in yourself.Once she's been in and out of it a few times, start to feed her in the crate, with the top half back in place, but the door still removed. Praise and reward heavily for every few minutes spent in the crate on her own (with the door still removed). You will need to decide when your dog is ready to move on to the next step and it's time to start closing the door on her. The time is right when she's relaxed and confident in the crate with the door still open.

Closing Her In:
The next step is going to be hard. Close the door, and shut your dog in. Don't make a fuss. When she goes in to eat, just reach over and close the door. At this point, you can either stand there and wait or walk away, but not so far that you can't hear her. If she starts to cry, do not go and let her out. Wait until she has settled down, and when all is quiet, then you can open the door and let her leave the crate on her own. Continue this for a number of days.

Edited by Pineappleman, 06 September 2009 - 01:27 PM.


#8 Onlyme2008

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 03:57 AM

If I was you, I would go back to shuting him in his crate of a night.

#9 Sarah_Louise

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 05:12 PM

It is always hard to help people with dog issues over the internet as there are so many different factors as to why dogs might start to do something different but preliminarily I would ask whether there was any difference that first night - i.e. was the cage still there and the door to the cage left open? (I presume so from reading your first post but thought I'd check).

Keeping the cage there for a good long time with the door left open is the way forward - literally keep things exactly the same as they were for all the months spent locked in the cage - same bedding, kept in the cage - bowl of water in the cage as per it was before the door was left open, etc.

Assuming all of the above was done that first night then I can only presume it was an attempt to "try it on"! Once they've got what they want (attention, in this case) just once, they will continue to try it on for night after night. Most dogs succeed and end up sleeping upstairs (and many in their owners beds!! :p )

I'm not saying to ignore the advice of the local dog trainer you have spoken to but I would certainly say you could up the exercise regime now - a small breed like a that can cope with more than 15 minutes a day. Certainly by that age. I would suggest a good 30 min+ walk before bed for definite. Preferably a little more or incorporate a game of fetch into it. Then have a "cool off" period before bed itself - like a chill out session. Think cardio exercise followed by the equivalent of a "story and snuggle time" for babies :D




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