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Hi Everyone, 

I am a police officer coming through the specials process at the moment (I have been accepted and start training in November) 

1) I currently only hold a Full Manual Licence. Am I going to be more attractive to the police regulars if i undertake special driving courses or broaden the vehicles i'm able to drive for example maybe getting my Motorbike licence or undertaking a ROSPA advance driving course? 

2) As someone with medical knowledge I could carry extra items and responded to medical emergencies as well. Would this knowledge put me 'ahead in the queue when it comes to driving with the police as you are more useful, if you get what i'm saying?

3) If i undertake driving courses and they cross with what you have to completed in the police later down the line for example a traffic cop, would you have to re-do them, i don't want to waste money.......

4) How long until you start driving solo patrol in the specials, is it part of training/ force specific?

Thank you for your answers everyone!

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Sapor62    107

Just to confirm, are you already a Police Officer or are you training to become a Police Officer? If you are in training you are not yet a Police Officer...

1) It's already difficult to get driving courses due to budget cuts since 2010 and lack of trainers, holding a manual license won't put you any further in the que as all Police Drivers must hold a manual license, so you're in the same boat as everyone else. It's also very unlikely you will get a driving course straight after training, most officers wait years, depending on force applied for. Met Police officers sometimes wait upwards of 6/7 years and that's regular police officers, not specials (This is for a response course - blue lights and sirens)

2) You won't be able to put any of your medical knowledge to use and will not be authorised to carry any extra equipment and if you did you could potentially be walking down a misconduct route, nearly all forces in the UK require you to undergo rigorous internal police medic training before you're allowed to carry medical items, the police medic course is one of the hardest courses to pass and has a massive failure rate as it is so demanding.

3) Driving courses carry over departments, if you're a response driver on response team you'll also remain one at traffic providing you have completed your refresher training.

4) Specials must complete IPS (Independent Patrol Status) before they can patrol alone, this can take anywhere from a few months to a couple of years, it all depends how much you put into it - driving courses are not part of initial training.

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kcl16    8

@PSCBen Brooker I'm not sure which force you are looking on joining but can comment from a met special standpoint.

IPS is generally (in my borough at least) expected to be attained within 12 months from when you attest (when you get your warrant card). 

If you want to go regular using the internal route you need to have attained IPS status or be on track to do so soonish and have the recommendation of your borough commander. There is usually an internal application drive for PCs twice a year. 

Re patrolling alone, I don't think any specials or indeed any regulars in my borough do solo patrols. It is one of the rougher boroughs in London.

 IPS refers to you being deemed competent and eligible for further specialisation within the specials/applying internally for the regs.. 

 

If you are looking to use the specials as a stepping stone to go regular then you won't get any driving courses in all likelihood, as sapor62 alluded to above you would likely have to be a special for a couple of years or more before you'd get any gucci courses. 

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Beaker    61

In my force driving is only allowed after completing IPS.  It' ls not easy to get either, I know of one guy who has been a couple of years waiting.  However they're desperately short of D1 licence holders (both SC and regular), so I'm told that bumps you up the list quite quickly.  I'm told to make my SCI aware I have it as soon as I'm either near the end of my PDP with only a couple of things to sign off, or as soon as I finish it.

Edited by Beaker
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SC Will    25

I'm a Special (have been since June 2016), about to resign to join the regulars now I have my training place confirmed.

To answer the questions:

Driving is not a mandatory thing, in other words you don't get it by default once you attest and get your warrant card, it's very much a privilege, I know of 1 special who was on my borough who was a BASIC driver, however to even get basic driving you MUST be IPS in the force i'm in (Met).

Unfortunately said special (not defining gender or name for anonymity purposes) was investigated by the DPS for using blue lights en-route to a call under a basic permit which said special was not allowed to do under any circumstances, as a result of the DPS investigation said special decided to resign, sad as said special was a very competent officer and very likable, that said, actions have consequences, basic drivers are reminded of their obligations and they have no lawful exemptions when driving, said special knew this but decided to disregard it when answering the call.

Response courses are very few and far between, I've been out with response team officers who have been in the job for 17 years and still haven't done a response driving course, although that's more because they have little interest in doing so. I've met plenty of officers who would love to do driving but aren't able to due to the lack of budget for such courses (each one costs approximately £2k), all of which have been in the job well over 5 years.

For Specials it's different, you may be offered a driving course, but you'll start on basic, this is usually a theory test and then a quick drive around with an inspector who will sign you off.Most forces tend to require those they offer courses to to have IPS (or the equivalent in other forces), i.e you are very experienced and would be able to handle yourself on your own out on the streets. There's literally no point giving a newly joined officer with little to no experience a driving permit which would then mean they take up a valuable resource (in the shape of a police vehicle) who would then be unable to deal with anything they might come across whilst out on vehicle patrol due to their lack of experience.

I too hold a full UK driving licence, with pass plus, have done since January 2013, but am still not allowed to drive AT ALL (not even basic) in the specials as i'm not IPS (I went down the CKP route to join the regulars).

Undertaking RoSPA courses are at the discretion of the force, they will offer you a basic/response/advanced etc driving course if they feel you are suitable and they have the capacity for it, they won't just give you one if you request it, otherwise every single officer, barring those who don't want to drive, would all be able to drive, which simply isn't the case.

As a general rule of thumb most PC's don't get any form of driving courses or taser courses until they are out of probation, because they could end up spending a few thousand on driving courses for you only for you to not meet the necessary criteria to pass your probationary period and be dismissed from the force, a waste of money.

As for the medical part - I'd strongly advise you NOT to carry anything medically related on you that you are not approved to carry or isn't standard issue, the only medical equipment you should be carrying (more in the vehicle than on your person) are possibly defibs (force and borough dependant) and a first aid kit which in the Met is mandatory for every patrol car before it's allowed out of the yard, carrying, or using any medical equipment on someone that you aren't approved for just leaves you wide open to civil or criminal litigation claims.

The force will "defend you" using the equipment they provide you provided you act reasonably an in accordance with use of force powers, if they find you have used something you were not permitted to use on someone (medical or not) they will not be defending you, in a legal aspect, should anything happen.

You can usually retain the skill when you transfer from department to department or borough to borough, provided you are "in date" so to speak or have done any required refresher courses.

Finally, driving to my knowledge is not any part of standard training in any force whatsoever, the training focuses solely on legislation and powers, not driving.

 

Also, how can you be a police officer when you don't start training until November?

You aren't a police officer officially until you attest and take the oath in the presence of a magistrate...

Edited by SC Will

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7 hours ago, Sapor62 said:

Just to confirm, are you already a Police Officer or are you training to become a Police Officer? If you are in training you are not yet a Police Officer...

1) It's already difficult to get driving courses due to budget cuts since 2010 and lack of trainers, holding a manual licence won't put you any further in the que as all Police Drivers must hold a manual licence, so you're in the same boat as everyone else. It's also very unlikely you will get a driving course straight after training, most officers wait years, depending on force applied for. Met Police officers sometimes wait upwards of 6/7 years and that's regular police officers, not specials (This is for a response course - blue lights and sirens)

2) You won't be able to put any of your medical knowledge to use and will not be authorised to carry any extra equipment and if you did you could potentially be walking down a misconduct route, nearly all forces in the UK require you to undergo rigorous internal police medic training before you're allowed to carry medical items, the police medic course is one of the hardest courses to pass and has a massive failure rate as it is so demanding.

3) Driving courses carry over departments, if you're a response driver on response team you'll also remain one at traffic providing you have completed your refresher training.

4) Specials must complete IPS (Independent Patrol Status) before they can patrol alone, this can take anywhere from a few months to a couple of years, it all depends how much you put into it - driving courses are not part of initial training.

My Apologies for the confusion, in training for specials, then on to the regulars. 

1) Its interesting you mention that people wait years for response driving, seeing as Suffolk police are so concerned all future regulars are able to satisfy the requirement to response drive, which is to hold a manual licence. Im guessing I won't be response driving as a special just patrol. 

2) I think I may of been misleading on this, I would never carry anything I wasn't supplied / allowed to. I was just enquiring as to whether having the knowledge gives me an advantage, puts me higher on the queue. But as you have said, medical training is required anyway the question has been answered so thank you :)

3) thats good to know, do you know if response driving courses are only supplied by emergency services, or could I go out and purchase a course much like ROSPA or other advance driving courses? For now anyway I'm obtaining my motorbike licence. 

4) so once you have obtained IPS you still not patrol with a car?

Thanks for taking the time to response.

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6 hours ago, kcl16 said:

@PSCBen Brooker I'm not sure which force you are looking on joining but can comment from a met special standpoint.

IPS is generally (in my borough at least) expected to be attained within 12 months from when you attest (when you get your warrant card). 

If you want to go regular using the internal route you need to have attained IPS status or be on track to do so soonish and have the recommendation of your borough commander. There is usually an internal application drive for PCs twice a year. 

Re patrolling alone, I don't think any specials or indeed any regulars in my borough do solo patrols. It is one of the rougher boroughs in London.

 IPS refers to you being deemed competent and eligible for further specialisation within the specials/applying internally for the regs.. 

 

If you are looking to use the specials as a stepping stone to go regular then you won't get any driving courses in all likelihood, as sapor62 alluded to above you would likely have to be a special for a couple of years or more before you'd get any gucci courses. 

Really valuable information here thanks @kcl16

:)

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6 hours ago, Beaker said:

In my force driving is only allowed after completing IPS.  It' ls not easy to get either, I know of one guy who has been a couple of years waiting.  However they're desperately short of D1 licence holders (both SC and regular), so I'm told that bumps you up the list quite quickly.  I'm told to make my SCI aware I have it as soon as I'm either near the end of my PDP with only a couple of things to sign off, or as soon as I finish it.

Interesting to know, D1 is minibus? I might look at that but, obtaining one is pretty hard to get, then again if its for my career its more than worth it :) thanks for the repair @Beaker

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Beaker    61
11 hours ago, PSCBen Brooker said:

Interesting to know, D1 is minibus? I might look at that but, obtaining one is pretty hard to get, then again if its for my career its more than worth it :) thanks for the repair @Beaker

TBH it won't make a huge difference if your force policy is that specials walk or go double crew.  Most SCs I hear about use their boots more than a car key, but in our force they like us to do LOTS of IR rather than just working events.  The Reg Supervision likes a double crew in a van if they can get it. 

Edited by Beaker

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1 minute ago, Beaker said:

TBH it won't make a huge difference if your force policy is that specials walk or go double crew.  Most SCs I hear about use their boots more than a car key, but in our force they like us to do LOTS of IR rather than just working events.  The Reg Supervision likes a double crew in a van if they can get it. 

I've heard Suffolk will allow patrol in a car pretty early on due to the size of the area i'm going for (Ipswich), if your London based foot patrol maybe the best option....?

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Beaker    61
17 minutes ago, PSCBen Brooker said:

I've heard Suffolk will allow patrol in a car pretty early on due to the size of the area i'm going for (Ipswich), if your London based foot patrol maybe the best option....?

Northern force, and I work the drug death capital of Britain.  So as busy as you're going to expect it to be.  Patch I work on is fairly varied as I don't work the central area except events.  I'm told the people doing that area walk everywhere, while those on my patch get driven for the most part.  Though the reg SGTs keep asking me if I'm IP and have my A-B as they're that level of busy.

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SC Will    25
4 hours ago, Beaker said:

TBH it won't make a huge difference if your force policy is that specials walk or go double crew.  Most SCs I hear about use their boots more than a car key, but in our force they like us to do LOTS of IR rather than just working events.  The Reg Supervision likes a double crew in a van if they can get it. 

Not where I am, if i'm with NTT/LPT (local disorder patrols we're either in 2 vans or a large carrier), if i'm with ERT (response) then i'm usually in a marked ford focus or vauxhall astra, although on one occasion I was paired up with a PC and put in the huge carrier, because we had run out of vehicles!

 

16 hours ago, PSCBen Brooker said:

My Apologies for the confusion, in training for specials, then on to the regulars. 

1) Its interesting you mention that people wait years for response driving, seeing as Suffolk police are so concerned all future regulars are able to satisfy the requirement to response drive, which is to hold a manual licence. Im guessing I won't be response driving as a special just patrol. 

2) I think I may of been misleading on this, I would never carry anything I wasn't supplied / allowed to. I was just enquiring as to whether having the knowledge gives me an advantage, puts me higher on the queue. But as you have said, medical training is required anyway the question has been answered so thank you :)

3) thats good to know, do you know if response driving courses are only supplied by emergency services, or could I go out and purchase a course much like ROSPA or other advance driving courses? For now anyway I'm obtaining my motorbike licence. 

4) so once you have obtained IPS you still not patrol with a car?

Thanks for taking the time to response.

1) Driving courses numbers and chances of getting it vary from force to force, in Kent police I hear the chances are good, whereas the force I'm in (Met) the odds of getting a course are slim, I know some PC's who have been doing the job a number of years and still aren't even basic drivers, that is, they can't drive any police vehicle AT ALL!

3) Response courses again vary from force to force, some forces have their own training schools (like the Met's driving school at Hendon), other forces will outsource to approved partners who will provide blue light training for their officers, and then of course a final assessment, they are only supplied to those in the services, you can't just go out as a civvy and complete a blue light driving course, they're for those in authority only.

4) IPS just basically means you are a competent officer, who has demonstrated that they know how to complete the majority of things, i.e completing a lawful stop and search, premises search, lawful arrest, vehicle seizure, drugs seizure, etc, I've been in a year and nowhere near IPS, what makes it worse is in the Met you are required to demonstrate every single competency TWICE.... so one stop and search done, to standard, the PC's you're with will sign it off, then you need to get your inspector/supervisor to sign it off, then you need to complete another stop and search to the required standard and get that signed off to, the same applies to every other criteria in the book, they said at my attestation it can take up to 12-18 months to achieve.

The quickest i've known anyone to become IPS from leaving training school is just under 4 months, although he really did cram shifts in and did 400 hours in the space of just 2 months, said person is now a regular alongside someone else I trained with as a special. Once you are IPS you have effectively "proven" your competence and so are trusted to do things such as driving, amongst some other things.

Also, I would advise you to refrain from saying you are a police officer when you aren't, even being in training you're still a candidate, until you attest you're still a civilian, that said, don't feel I'm getting at you, just some advice, i'm sure you'll love it, joining as a special is the best thing I've ever done.

 

Edited by SC Will

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Beaker    61
13 minutes ago, SC Will said:

Not where I am, if i'm with NTT/LPT (local disorder patrols we're either in 2 vans or a large carrier), if i'm with ERT (response) then i'm usually in a marked ford focus or vauxhall astra, although on one occasion I was paired up with a PC and put in the huge carrier, because we had run out of vehicles!

Yeah, every force is a little bit different.  Our regs are tied up heavily with ongoing long term protests at a particular site.  So they're stretched thin.  SCs are being used to fill gaps where possible.  I'm about 65% through my PDP, in 3 months of activity.  Need toto hit it a bit harder, but as I'm not allowed to go out with RPU, do custody or in fact anything but IR and set events it's going to be difficult.  

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3 minutes ago, Beaker said:

Yeah, every force is a little bit different.  Our regs are tied up heavily with ongoing long term protests at a particular site.  So they're stretched thin.  SCs are being used to fill gaps where possible.  I'm about 65% through my PDP, in 3 months of activity.  Need toto hit it a bit harder, but as I'm not allowed to go out with RPU, do custody or in fact anything but IR and set events it's going to be difficult.  

Is your plan to go to the regulars once you have finished your PDP? Can you shed a little light on the PDP and the training process your force goes through to achieve IPS? And once completed are you able to be ring fenced for the regulars, by which i mean do you have to go through the application process that non specials have to, I would hate to see hundreds of hours of specials work wasted because of what could be nerves at the regulars interview, I was nervous enough for the specials hahah......

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SC Will    25
2 minutes ago, PSCBen Brooker said:

Is your plan to go to the regulars once you have finished your PDP? Can you shed a little light on the PDP and the training process your force goes through to achieve IPS? And once completed are you able to be ring fenced for the regulars, by which i mean do you have to go through the application process that non specials have to, I would hate to see hundreds of hours of specials work wasted because of what could be nerves at the regulars interview, I was nervous enough for the specials hahah......

Whether you are CKP special to join regulars or IPS, you do not just "join the regulars", you resign from the MSC and join the regular force, so yes, you will have to go through the assessment process twice, I agree it's a bit tedious, but hey ho.

I've been through the process twice, first time as a Special in October 2015, then this time round as a regular in February 2017 (was supposed to have my Day 1 in November 2016 but was unwell, that was the next date available).

Day 1 SEARCH assessment scores are valid for 12 months, so if you pass your day 1 but don't make the grade with your applied to force, you can always transfer your application across to most other forces, although some forces have restrictions on this and don't allow this, those are usually specialist forces however.

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Beaker    61
5 minutes ago, PSCBen Brooker said:

Is your plan to go to the regulars once you have finished your PDP? Can you shed a little light on the PDP and the training process your force goes through to achieve IPS? And once completed are you able to be ring fenced for the regulars, by which i mean do you have to go through the application process that non specials have to, I would hate to see hundreds of hours of specials work wasted because of what could be nerves at the regulars interview, I was nervous enough for the specials hahah......

With my force being an SC doesn't improve your chances as much as people think.  You're still required to go through the application process, you just happen to have a bit more of an idea what the police do. TBH It's worth it for the experience, and to see if you'd get on with it.  I may apply to the regs, I may not.  Have to see howI feel when the application process opens up. 

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2 minutes ago, SC Will said:

Whether you are CKP special to join regulars or IPS, you do not just "join the regulars", you resign from the MSC and join the regular force, so yes, you will have to go through the assessment process twice, I agree it's a bit tedious, but hey ho.

I've been through the process twice, first time as a Special in October 2015, then this time round as a regular in February 2017 (was supposed to have my Day 1 in November 2016 but was unwell, that was the next date available).

Day 1 SEARCH assessment scores are valid for 12 months, so if you pass your day 1 but don't make the grade with your applied to force, you can always transfer your application across to most other forces, although some forces have restrictions on this and don't allow this, those are usually specialist forces however.

Its a bit disappointing to hear you have to go through the application process twice, but that's there decision and I will just have to do my best when the time comes round. 

I plan on doing my specials in Suffolk and once IPS has been achieved, transferring or applying for the regulars in Essex, personal reasons....

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3 minutes ago, Beaker said:

With my force being an SC doesn't improve your chances as much as people think.  You're still required to go through the application process, you just happen to have a bit more of an idea what the police do. TBH It's worth it for the experience, and to see if you'd get on with it.  I may apply to the regs, I may not.  Have to see howI feel when the application process opens up. 

I have been told once you pass the initial assessment center and get to the final board interview, this is where being a special will really shine through, the experience of being a special is invaluable. You also don't need a level 3 qualification to be regular if you are a special (otherwise you do), this doesn't really apply because i have one anyway.....

 

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SC Will    25
1 minute ago, Beaker said:

With my force being an SC doesn't improve your chances as much as people think.  You're still required to go through the application process, you just happen to have a bit more of an idea what the police do. TBH It's worth it for the experience, and to see if you'd get on with it.  I may apply to the regs, I may not.  Have to see howI feel when the application process opens up. 

That's exactly why I joined the specials.... from a young age I wanted to be a Pilot or a PC, the cost of pilot training (in the region of £130k plus) made it prohibitively expensive, so I opted for the latter option, at one stage I had a brief spell where I wanted to be a paramedic but I feel uneasy when doing basic medical tasks such as taking pulses etc... so decided probably not the best career for me!

I joined the specials as a "try before you buy" sort of thing, try it out, and see if I enjoyed it, which I most certainly do, now the prospect of being paid to do the same role is even more appealing, so I decided to jump on the bandwagon and apply, was successful, and start training in a few weeks.

I've heard from a few people who were specials, but are now regulars, and say "don't join", they're constantly depressed from going to horrendous callouts, I suppose it's all down to the person, just need to remember that death is a part of life, sad as it is.

Being a special helps, yes, but it most certainly does not guarantee you a place in training for the regulars, you still need to retake a day 1 and day 2 and prove that you are competent.

When I had my day 1 for the specials, we had interviews, but no roleplays, for the regulars we had both interviews and a roleplay.

Likewise for the specials the interview was a bit basic, whereas for the regulars they would probe further, so you'd give an answer and they'd say "Can you explain more detail how this fits in with x criteria?"... for instance, or "what do you mean by that?".

Day 2 was almost identical, except for the regulars they took a sample of hair from me for SMT, whereas for the specials only 1 in 3 candidates were randomly selected to have it done, and it was done through a urine sample.

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SC Will    25
Just now, PSCBen Brooker said:

I have been told once you pass the initial assessment center and get to the final board interview, this is where being a special will really shine through, the experience of being a special is invaluable. You also don't need a level 3 qualification to be regular if you are a special (otherwise you do), this doesn't really apply because i have one anyway.....

 

Force dependent, most forces (barring about 2/3) required you to either be a special with IPS OR have a CKP, the met started using the CKP as a route to entry when they dropped the secondary language requirement for applicants, in around 2013/2014.

Kent also used to require you to have the CKP, just before I completed mine they dropped this requirement and it was no longer listed on their website.

I did consider transferring across to kent as with all the kerfuffle that went on during my process to join the regulars I had a bad feeling that it wouldn't end well, so was preparing for the worst and thinking if it goes belly up, i'd transfer my search score over  to Kent (bearing in mind I live on the London/Kent border).

In the Met there is no "final board interview", nor any "home visit" from an inspector... the only interview you have is at the day 1 assessment centre, that's it.

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Beaker    61

My SC interview lasted nearly an hour and a half.  Came out feeling like i'd been through the mill.  Most people seem to have had 30 minutes and done.  No roleplays though.

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2 minutes ago, SC Will said:

That's exactly why I joined the specials.... from a young age I wanted to be a Pilot or a PC, the cost of pilot training (in the region of £130k plus) made it prohibitively expensive, so I opted for the latter option, at one stage I had a brief spell where I wanted to be a paramedic but I feel uneasy when doing basic medical tasks such as taking pulses etc... so decided probably not the best career for me!

I joined the specials as a "try before you buy" sort of thing, try it out, and see if I enjoyed it, which I most certainly do, now the prospect of being paid to do the same role is even more appealing, so I decided to jump on the bandwagon and apply, was successful, and start training in a few weeks.

I've heard from a few people who were specials, but are now regulars, and say "don't join", they're constantly depressed from going to horrendous callouts, I suppose it's all down to the person, just need to remember that death is a part of life, sad as it is.

Being a special helps, yes, but it most certainly does not guarantee you a place in training for the regulars, you still need to retake a day 1 and day 2 and prove that you are competent.

When I had my day 1 for the specials, we had interviews, but no roleplays, for the regulars we had both interviews and a roleplay.

Likewise for the specials the interview was a bit basic, whereas for the regulars they would probe further, so you'd give an answer and they'd say "Can you explain more detail how this fits in with x criteria?"... for instance, or "what do you mean by that?".

Day 2 was almost identical, except for the regulars they took a sample of hair from me for SMT, whereas for the specials only 1 in 3 candidates were randomly selected to have it done, and it was done through a urine sample.

I opted to join the specials for the same reason, a try before you buy is a great way to describe it. I applied and was successful in March, was scheduled for intake starting in September but this clashed with me getting married and so its been moved to the final intake of the year (Nov 1 - 25 March 18), once I have completed training I will put everything I have into building hours and experience in order to better help me decide if the police family is the right family for me. 

I only had one day tests for the specials it involved, maths and English tests, SJT (situational judgement tests) and an interview with 4 multiple choice competency questions, my results all came back A. I did get probed in my competency interview but i cant speak if its as probing as the regulars. 

I guess my day 2 was the fitness test (bleep) and the medical (eye, hearing and oxygen intake), I was given a urine test but everything was fine. I'm not sure if i was randomly selected for the urine test, from the way she conducted herself it seems everyone is given it. 

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SC Will    25
3 minutes ago, Beaker said:

My SC interview lasted nearly an hour and a half.  Came out feeling like i'd been through the mill.  Most people seem to have had 30 minutes and done.  No roleplays though.

The specials one for me lasted around 20 minutes or so.

For the regulars it's a bit odd, they ask you 4 questions, you have 5 minutes to answer each one, in detail, to demonstrate you have the key values and competencies they are after.

In my interview the woman was literally sat there, she'd ask a question, and push a button and start the timer! She was also audio recording for some reason.... 

At one question I was mid-way through giving an answer when the timer went off, irritating to say the least, having to end an answer half way through explaining something! :p

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5 minutes ago, Beaker said:

My SC interview lasted nearly an hour and a half.  Came out feeling like i'd been through the mill.  Most people seem to have had 30 minutes and done.  No roleplays though.

Mine was about 20min, I came out way early than anyone else and thought it was a bad sign. No role plays for me either.

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Just now, SC Will said:

The specials one for me lasted around 20 minutes or so.

For the regulars it's a bit odd, they ask you 4 questions, you have 5 minutes to answer each one, in detail, to demonstrate you have the key values and competencies they are after.

In my interview the woman was literally sat there, she'd ask a question, and push a button and start the timer! She was also audio recording for some reason.... 

At one question I was mid-way through giving an answer when the timer went off, irritating to say the least, having to end an answer half way through explaining something! :p

You have literally just described my specials interview, i was told at recruitment this part is the same......

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