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Daily Mail: Tragedy as 5-year-old boy shoots dead his sister, 2, with child-size .22 caliber rifle he was given as a GIFT


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#1 Marty McFly

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:26 PM

Tragedy as 5-year-old boy shoots dead his sister, 2, with child-size .22 caliber rifle he was given as a GIFT

 

  • Caroline Starks, 2, was fatally shot in the chest after the children's mother stepped outside for a few minutes according to police
  • Firearm was a Crickett designed for small kids with slogan 'My First Rifle'
  • Maker Keystone Sporting Arms produced 60,000 Crickett and Chipmunk rifles in 2008
  • Its website contains dozens of images of boys and girls brandishing guns at shooting ranges and on deer hunts
  • Kentucky sheriff: Not unusual for children to have a gun

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail...given-GIFT.html

 

 

I would post the full story, but there's a load of pictures - far too many to copy.



#2 Shikari

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:29 PM

Tragic.

 

No doubt the Americans will use this as more fuel for their big debate over gun control, but surely the child should have been taught how to have a gun before they gave it him, not that I'm blaming him of course.



#3 Marty McFly

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:32 PM

Tragic.

 

No doubt the Americans will use this as more fuel for their big debate over gun control, but surely the child should have been taught how to have a gun before they gave it him, not that I'm blaming him of course.

 

He shouldn't have been left alone with a firearm even if he was shown how to use it.

 

If they're going to let him shoot, it should've been in a secure place where he couldn't get access to it and thus could only be used under parental supervision.

 

That is leaving aside my own feelings on giving a five year old a firearm, which I think is shocking on its own. He shouldn't have been anywhere near a gun at his age.



#4 Eski

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:20 PM

This is an endless debate, but where is the sense in giving a child a gun. Regardless of him being shown how to use it safely he's 5! I was happy with power rangers toys at his age. Are we really living in an age where everyone needs to be trained to kill?


Edited by Eski, 02 May 2013 - 09:22 PM.


#5 AmeriCop

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:16 AM

As stated. This was poor parenting. Would it be any different if the kids got into cleaner or prescription medication?

Some things do need to be secured. Guns, meds, dangerous chemicals etc

Edited by AmeriCop, 03 May 2013 - 02:16 AM.


#6 Marty McFly

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:45 AM

As stated. This was poor parenting. Would it be any different if the kids got into cleaner or prescription medication?Some things do need to be secured. Guns, meds, dangerous chemicals etc

Its very different, I wouldn't let kids play with chemicals or other peoples prescription medication even if I was watching, nor would I give them as gifts. If anyone gave a 5 year old a bottle of chemicals as a present then let them play with it unattended they'd be getting charged with a criminal offence.

How its acceptable to market lethal weapons to children/purchase them as gifts for a 5 year old I'll never know.

#7 GoneForgotten

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 09:09 AM

Its very different, I wouldn't let kids play with chemicals or other peoples prescription medication even if I was watching, nor would I give them as gifts. If anyone gave a 5 year old a bottle of chemicals as a present then let them play with it unattended they'd be getting charged with a criminal offence.

How its acceptable to market lethal weapons to children/purchase them as gifts for a 5 year old I'll never know.

 

At some point (early) my Son is going to be introduce to firearms, probably rifles.  He'll be closely supervised.  They'll be demystified and good skills and drills will be ingrained from an early age.  Just because a child might have their own of something doesn't mean it's theirs to use, keep under their bed without oversight.  We're saving for out little boy and when he's old enough he'll get to spend some of his own money, with our permission, up to a point.  It's about taking the responsibility for him. 

 

My lad toddled into the garage after me last weekend as I was getting some stuff out of the fridge.  He found a (poorly placed) tub of polly filla and managed to get the top of it off and as is his want at the moment, lick the (outside) of the lid.  All in the space of about 10 seconds and I was about 3 feet from him, cue dropped food all over the place a shout and my snatching him up off the floor.  Boy, that's very very naughty don't ever do that again!  Mummy, here's little boy.  Quietly, "Daddy was very naughty and didn't do his job properly."  I've now moved all the stuff off the floor that poses a significant risk to him and the garage is now off limits (along with the kitchen which is already).

 

I'm with Americop, it's poor parenting and the ramifications here were terrible.  



#8 AmeriCop

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 04:49 AM

Its going to be a culture clash, but I "had my own" firearm by age 8-10. a .22 youth rifle and a .410 youth sized shot gun. I never had ownership control of them at that point and was alotted ammo while shooting so that all rounds were accounted for. Upon returning, my father would ask to ensure i had no rounds with me ( that " dont lie to me " kind of ask)  after that i cleaned all the guns we shot that day and my father secured them.

 

I "had"  a firearm before i had a BB gun. I wasnt allowed a bb gun until i was 12 or so, though it went to my control with stict orders it didnt leave the yard with out permission. My fathers logic was to express the seriousness of the topic first. The fun of the shooting second.



#9 callsign-kid

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 09:04 PM

Debate about the rights and wrongs of firearm ownership but the firearm itself is a machine and if handled correctly is quite harmless. of course one would not let their child in charge of it unsupervised for the same reason it is a bad idea to leave a child in charge of a motorcar. Had it have been cleared and secured properly by the parent then this tragedy would not have happened.



#10 Radman

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 03:42 AM

Five years old is very young to be left unsupervised (or even supervised - isnt something i'd ever do) with a firearm and ammunition - very poor parenting here, very poor.




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