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First aid training


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#1 lintymantis

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 12:14 PM

As someone who is due to start training in march I was wondering what level of first aid training specials receive is it really basic ie just CPR and stopping bleeding? Or does it go into a bit more depth?

(and yes the title of the thread should of been first AID training but iam using an iPad and the predictive text got excited)

Edited by Damsel, 11 February 2012 - 01:00 PM.
Amended topic title only


#2 Train Boy

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 12:19 PM

I'd imagine it's largely force specific, what force are you applying to?

I'm not sure what the level of First Aid is called that we do, but it's a two day course. That said I'm a FAAW with the Red Cross so I don't have to do the FA training the police give.

#3 cfnbryn

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 12:45 PM

In Dyfed-Powys we do the FAW (first aid at work) qualification.

#4 lintymantis

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 12:46 PM

1328962744[/url]' post='2198389']
I'd imagine it's largely force specific, what force are you applying to?

I'm not sure what the level of First Aid is called that we do, but it's a two day course. That said I'm a FAAW with the Red Cross so I don't have to do the FA training the police give.


I've applied for Derbyshire constabulary.

Is this "first aid at work" qualification a qualification that can be officially used outside of the police? as in would I be able to use it to become a registered first aider at my workplace?

Edited by lintymantis, 11 February 2012 - 12:52 PM.


#5 majordax

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 01:59 PM

In Lancs we do a 1 day course. Everyone except 1 SC has to do it even those that are first aid trainers.

The one SC excused from having to do the 1 day course is a paramedic in his day job.

#6 Woody

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 06:37 PM

As someone who is due to start training in march I was wondering what level of first aid training specials receive is it really basic ie just CPR and stopping bleeding? Or does it go into a bit more depth?

(and yes the title of the thread should of been first AID training but iam using an iPad and the predictive text got excited)


avon and som is very basic.

#7 AnthonyB

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 07:55 PM

Whilst it differs from force to force the recommended framework is set by the NPIA:

Level 1 - Emergency Life Support
Level 2 - Operational First Aid Skills
Level 3 - Custody First Aid Skills
Level 4 - First Aid At Work
Level 5 - Specialist First Aid Skills

Level 1 is a basic 4 hour course for non-operational police staff & similar

Level 2 is the recommended minimum for general patrol staff, operational support staff and public contact support staff and is at minimum of 1 day (some forces spread it to two) and covers the syllabus of the HSE Emergency First Aid at Work course with some forces having their L2 courses HSE registered so they go towards meeting their commitments under the Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981

Level 3 is the recommended minimum for custody staff. It is the same as the Level 2 course in content & duration, but the training is aimed at giving first aid with consideration for psychiatry, self-harm, drugs and alcohol.

Level 4 is the full three day HSE First Aid at Work course to satisfy commitments under the Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 as well as being the minimum training for Police specialists such as Fire Arm Officers and PSU medics.

Level 5 is a bespoke level determined force by force and allows for the use of specialist equipment such as Oxygen, Haemostatic agents, splints, CAT's, etc.

The use of AEDs (defibrillators) was once a Level 5 skill, but is being rolled out to more people by some forces.

#8 jonhny

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 11:20 PM

Defib training is standard in the met.

#9 Blakey

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 11:31 PM

I've applied for Derbyshire constabulary.

Is this "first aid at work" qualification a qualification that can be officially used outside of the police? as in would I be able to use it to become a registered first aider at my workplace?



Yes HSE First aid at work you can use in workplace or Events :)

#10 Bart S

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 01:24 AM

Defib training is standard in the met.



Defib training is now part of the competency based standard first aid course. :)

#11 MetPaul

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 11:55 AM

Incidentally, Met SC's who hold a current FAAW certificate do not have to attend ELS refreshers.

#12 Giraffe

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 12:12 PM

Incidentally, Met SC's who hold a current FAAW certificate do not have to attend ELS refreshers.


I have a FAAW certificate, and I thought under the legislation that it was only valid at the workplace where it was awarded and non-transferable. Also my FAAW certificate is valid for three years, whereas my police refreshers (which in my view are far better than the FAAW training) are every 12 months.

Surrey also train de-fib as standard.

#13 Switch

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 12:14 PM

Incidentally, Met SC's who hold a current FAAW certificate do not have to attend ELS refreshers.


That is incorrect as I have FAAW and still have to do refreshers as told to me by head of FA.

#14 David

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 12:25 PM

Paramedic SCs in Hampshire still have to do our ELS and refreshers, as do other First Aiders.

#15 MetPaul

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 12:52 PM

That is incorrect as I have FAAW and still have to do refreshers as told to me by head of FA.

Oh well, if your head of FA has said it, then the MSC SOP's must be completely wrong then :p
I know where I'd rather quote from though.

#16 Gelf

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 01:10 PM

I am FAAW trained and not only did I still have to partake in the refresher (which is about as thorough as giving someone a business card size CPR prompt and telling them to crack on) but I also had to correct the outdated information being given to the class by the trainer who clearly didnt know much about first aid. :p

#17 MetPaul

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 03:21 PM

Gelf, that basic level you're describing sounds more like EFAAW (emergency FAAW).
The FAAW courses I've attended and the trainers have been as thorough as the ELS courses I've been on.
However, in view of what I said above, I still attend the annual ELS refresher. Nice to keep things fresh in the mind.

#18 ococircusboy

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 04:13 PM

Everyone is suppose to do theire counties first aid training so the force can say that they have trained you to their standard. even paramedics have to do the course. FAW is transferable as it is a standard set by the HSE. The met train to Efaw level as standard for officers. The mets FAW course is always full before the course has made it onto selfservice

I am FAAW trained and not only did I still have to partake in the refresher (which is about as thorough as giving someone a business card size CPR prompt and telling them to crack on) but I also had to correct the outdated information being given to the class by the trainer who clearly didnt know much about first aid. :unsure:

Had the same issue before. ELS instructor last week was great when i did it and clearly kept herself up to date on recent changes. I practically had to run an ELS session the previous year.

#19 Gelf

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 06:14 PM

Gelf, that basic level you're describing sounds more like EFAAW (emergency FAAW).
The FAAW courses I've attended and the trainers have been as thorough as the ELS courses I've been on.
However, in view of what I said above, I still attend the annual ELS refresher. Nice to keep things fresh in the mind.

No, my FAAW course was done through the Ministry of Defence. The training I got with the police was a VERY basic 2 hour session, that was my point.

#20 Switch

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 07:17 PM

Oh well, if your head of FA has said it, then the MSC SOP's must be completely wrong then :aok:
I know where I'd rather quote from though.


No this is the Head of First Aid for met and iv forgotten her name. So I will go with her I think.

#21 Giraffe

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 07:26 PM

Gelf, that basic level you're describing sounds more like EFAAW (emergency FAAW).
The FAAW courses I've attended and the trainers have been as thorough as the ELS courses I've been on.
However, in view of what I said above, I still attend the annual ELS refresher. Nice to keep things fresh in the mind.


The full FAAW training is three days, and the emergency one you mention is one day. As I understand it the legislation means that the training you receive is only valid for the place of work named on the certificate. The FAAW is valid for three years and is designed for the workplace - it doesn't take account of policing situations and doesn't give de-fib training.

I'm guessing the exact syllabus of police first aid training varies from force to force, but most (if not all) forces are required to ensure their officers have refreshers every twelve months, and in my force also covers areas such as de-fib, SADCHALET, removing crash helmets, none of which are covered in either the one or three day FAAWs.

More importantly, Specials are (in my experience) far more likely to be giving first aid on a regular basis than at work in their day jobs. The more you practice first aid the better you get at it, so logic dictates that it's in the force's interest to ensure that all public facing officers have annual refreshers. I am not a Met officer so have no idea whether what you are saying about the Met exempting FAAW qualified SCs is correct or not, but I think if that is correct then it's a policy that should certainly be re-evaluated.

#22 andituk

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 07:34 PM

I did mine for GMP yesterday, and tbh, I was supposed at how basic it was really. It's a 6 hour course that needs to be done every 3 years.

People with a current certificate were told they didn't have to attend, and we were told at the end if we wanted one we could request a certificate which would be valid elsewhere.

#23 Switch

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 07:38 PM

The full FAAW training is three days, and the emergency one you mention is one day. As I understand it the legislation means that the training you receive is only valid for the place of work named on the certificate. The FAAW is valid for three years and is designed for the workplace - it doesn't take account of policing situations and doesn't give de-fib training.

I'm guessing the exact syllabus of police first aid training varies from force to force, but most (if not all) forces are required to ensure their officers have refreshers every twelve months, and in my force also covers areas such as de-fib, SADCHALET, removing crash helmets, none of which are covered in either the one or three day FAAWs.

More importantly, Specials are (in my experience) far more likely to be giving first aid on a regular basis than at work in their day jobs. The more you practice first aid the better you get at it, so logic dictates that it's in the force's interest to ensure that all public facing officers have annual refreshers. I am not a Met officer so have no idea whether what you are saying about the Met exempting FAAW qualified SCs is correct or not, but I think if that is correct then it's a policy that should certainly be re-evaluated.


You're right Giraffe, however there is a sub-type of FAAW qualifcation, which is the same but I believe it is just a paper process that allows you to be FAAW at any workplace, which mine is due to the fact I work at different centers for different companies.

#24 Giraffe

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 07:42 PM

You're right Giraffe, however there is a sub-type of FAAW qualifcation, which is the same but I believe it is just a paper process that allows you to be FAAW at any workplace, which mine is due to the fact I work at different centers for different companies.


Aah I wasn't aware of that, but it makes sense. My FAAW training will become null and void when I move onto a new job in April. Fortunately as I'm moving on to the Ambulance Service, I'm sure there will be plenty of qualified people around. :aok:

#25 Switch

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 07:44 PM

Aah I wasn't aware of that, but it makes sense. My FAAW training will become null and void when I move onto a new job in April. Fortunately as I'm moving on to the Ambulance Service, I'm sure there will be plenty of qualified people around. :aok:


haha yeah, I'm sure you will be swamped with courses and also people who can run any additional courses you want. Thankfully the Royal Navy lot I used to work for have a great pool of assessors, mine runs out soon.




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