ammo1234

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About ammo1234

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  1. 22 when I joined, average of my class was about 26/27
  2. Cool, I wasn't aware of that
  3. oh ok, I was looking at the ones that say UK rank insignia not the COLP ones , the one with 20300 as the collar number?
  4. Sgt's still have their collar numbers below the chevrons .. think the initial epaulette pics have them the wrong way around.. pics look really clear though!
  5. A CPS lawyer I spoke to about this very thing, felt it was pointless putting I am PC/PS .... from ... station etc. They wanted 'This statement is in relation a 'theft matter (insert whatever) at ... that occurred on .... . Basically it meant they knew it was a statement for their job and they then wanted the 5 part statement after that. The same was taught to me in training, that it is just a waste of your time saying who you are etc. Exactly the same with specialist officer statements that tell me about all the gucci training they have in laser guns, in car camera, driving grade, dog handling etc but don't describe the offender or where they recovered property from!
  6. I've not known of any special so/do or s/sgts s/insp to be called by their rank by regulars. On the response teams, when a special turns up to work with the team, they are posted to work with a PC and with the exception of the parade where postings are read out -(PC Bloggs with S/Sgt Miggins) everyone just calls them by their first names. Never been an issue with it that I've been aware of.
  7. I did say get down the gym and put some weight on, not sure where takeaways came into it. A lot of people have talked about people wanting to fight big people, but this is less common than someone fancying their chances against someone smaller than them. The point I was making is, there is only benefits to training (both weight and self defence). I accept a slimmer faster officer is perhaps more likely to catch a suspect in a foot chase, but it's nice to know that you can deal with the situation when you catch them. I don't think anyone would dispute the ability to be able to speak to people properly is your first weapon in your arsenal but a fallback option when that may fail is important....
  8. Those police forces have covert body armour, which for me is the biggest thing that make our police officers appear more paramilitary. Those forces can wear shirts and flat caps because their body armour is underneath the shirt and they don't have the obsession with hi-vis that goes on here. I would much rather wear a uniform similar to the NYPD. Baseball caps are used by police forces in the US in many big city forces - NYPD/Chicago have baseball caps issued to officers just as an example - the difference is that in the US, the powers that be will spend the money on giving officers a flat cap, a baseball cap, a street uniform, and a dress uniform but over here it's all about cost.
  9. Mergers may have limited impact on most current ACPO ranks on the basis that many would be overseeing the process and retiring shortly afterwards.
  10. Get yourself down the gym son! No harm in having a bit of extra weight to go with your skills. Consider adding some sort of self defence course to build on the (very) basic PST you get from the job. The more physical stuff is easier if you are fitter and stronger and there are no two ways about it! Don't be put off by what I'm saying and all the tips mentioned by people will make the job easier for you, but it can't hurt to have something to back it up with as some people just don't want to talk.
  11. I work in an extremely diverse inner city area and I understand that there are sections of the community who distrust the police and some who openly hate the police and it is a real challenge to deal with people who behave in that way. All I would like to put forward is a slightly different viewpoint: Someone who hates the police has that right to hold that opinion sadly. They are not being paid a wage and are not hired to work for the community. We are. We are the police and it's for us to work to improve relations with people. If a person has had a number of bad interactions with the police the next one they have is unlikely to see a positive attitude from them. They will ensure all their friends who haven't had interactions with the police will hear all about how bad they were. We are the ones who need to change their mindset during that next interaction and the next one and the one after that. We can't just write off whole sections of society and say they aren't worth bothering about because they are part of what we work for - the public. Wishy washy love the world ain't really my thing but this is one subject where I think it's down to the police to change mindsets and not rely on the public to do it on their own. The police have improved their relationship with the public before and they can do it again.
  12. Warwickshire and West Mercia are basically one force in all but name and they have said the only reason it hasn't gone all the way is because one of the two PCCs isn't too keen on it.
  13. AHahahaaa Good one!!
  14. Just a thought, I know people always rush to talk about policing in the Uk would become like that in the USA if the police were armed but I think that is highly unlikely. It's far more likely to end up like policing on mainland Europe where many police forces have routinely armed officers with basic training and they don't go around doing blanket armed call outs at vehicle stops. Gun control is massively tighter here than the USA and the availability of guns here is so much lower that I couldn't see the need to approach day to day policing in that way.
  15. I can understand wanting to join fairly quickly, but I assume you would want to enjoy the work and not be fed up by having to commute such a distance every day. Would you consider forces where the CPK is not an essential requirement?