All Activity

This stream auto-updates   

  1. Today
  2. Just boggles my mind really...
  3. PC Declan Gabriel, pictured right, spent the majority of two hours with a 17-year-old girl, it is claimed A police constable has appeared in court accused of raping a 17-year-old girl while on duty. PC Declan Gabriel, 28, is also accused of two counts of sexual assault and misconduct in public office. A jury at Northampton Crown Court heard he forced the girl into an oral sex act in Northampton on 21 September, 2015. PC Gabriel denies all the charges, claiming the teenager sexually assaulted him. Image copyright Google Image caption PC Declan Gabriel is accused of raping a teenage girl at Northampton Crematorium The court was told the Northamptonshire Police officer was on duty in a single-crewed vehicle when he attended an incident in Hunsbury, Northampton, in the early hours. Prosecutor Matthew Lowe said the alleged victim had been thrown out of home by her mother and spent two hours with PC Gabriel, apparently in an attempt to find her somewhere to stay. Mr Lowe said PC Gabriel "turned the conversation to sexual matters" and "bragged" of having slept with someone 10 minutes after meeting her. He said PC Gabriel tried to contact one of the girl's friends using his phone, but received no answer. 'Lay-by' After stopping at Mereway Police Station to leave the girl's mobile phone on charge, they drove to the friends' address but did not stop as no lights were on. Instead, the jury heard, PC Gabriel pulled into a lorry lay-by and sexually assaulted her. They drove back to her friends' house, but again left with no attempt to knock on the door before driving to Northampton Crematorium. PC Gabriel is alleged to have sexually assaulted her again, before forcing her to perform an oral sex act. 'Freaked out' When interviewed by police, the girl said she had "felt freaked out". PC Gabriel said the girl had sexually assaulted him at the crematorium while he was adjusting his underwear, something Mr Lowe called "a fanciful, ludicrous account". The case continues. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-northamptonshire-39042546
  4. British suicide bomber dies in attack on Iraqi forces in Mosul 21 February 2017 From the section UK Image caption A picture of Fiddler was released by the so-called Islamic State group A British IS fighter who died in a suicide bomb attack on Iraqi forces in Mosul is a former Guantanamo Bay detainee, the BBC understands. The self-styled Islamic State group said two days ago that Abu-Zakariya al-Britani detonated a car bomb at an Iraqi army base in Tal Gaysum, south-west of Mosul. He is believed to have been originally known as Ronald Fiddler. Fiddler, 50 and from Manchester, was sent to Guantanamo Bay in 2002. Who are Britain’s jihadists? IS has now published a photograph of Fiddler, who was also known as Jamal al-Harith before taking the nom-du-guerre Abu-Zakariya al-Britani. He had been seized by US forces in Pakistan in 2001, before being sent to Guantanamo. US interrogators found he provided useful information to them about the Taliban's methods, and he was released after two years. UK fighters The BBC has seen IS registration papers signed by Fiddler in April 2014 when he crossed into Syria from Turkey. He volunteered to be a fighter, saying his knowledge of Islam was basic. His wife and five children went to Syria try to persuade him to come back, but failed and his wife said they ended up having to flee for their lives from IS territory. According to figures published by the UK government last year, about 850 people regarded as a national security concern have gone to become fighters in the Middle East. Of those, just under half have returned to the UK and approximately 15% are dead. A Foreign Office spokeswoman said: "The UK has advised for some time against all travel to Syria, and against all travel to large parts of Iraq. "As all UK consular services are suspended in Syria and greatly limited in Iraq, it is extremely difficult to confirm the whereabouts and status of British nationals in these areas." View the full article
  5. Heterosexual couple lose civil partnership challenge 21 February 2017 From the section UK Media captionRebecca Steinfeld and Charles Keidan: "There's everything to fight for"A heterosexual couple have lost their Court of Appeal battle to have a civil partnership instead of a marriage. Rebecca Steinfeld and Charles Keidan, from London, challenged a ruling that said they did not meet the legal requirement of being the same sex. The judges said there was a potential breach of their human rights, but the government should have more time to decide the future of civil partnership. The couple said there was still "everything to fight for". They intend to appeal to the Supreme Court. A government spokesman said it welcomed the ruling and would take the judgement into account during its evaluation of civil partnerships. Why choose civil partnership over marriage? The BBC's legal affairs correspondent Clive Coleman said the couple had lost by the "narrowest of margins". Our correspondent said: "The government's 'wait and see' policy, which is based on looking at the take-up of same-sex civil partnerships, was found by Lady Justice Arden not to be not good enough to address the discrimination faced by heterosexual couples. "However, her fellow judges were prepared to let the government have a little more time and so the case was lost on that issue alone." 'Equality and choice' Image copyright Kate Stewart Kate Stewart and Matthew Cole, 46, decided to get a civil partnership in Gibraltar, a British Overseas Territory, in June 2016, after deciding marriage was not for them. "Matthew and I didn't feel that marriage reflected our relationship," said Dr Stewart, from Derby. "The institution [of marriage] is very much unequal depending on your religion. "We therefore felt it wasn't a status we were comfortable with because it still had hangovers of inequality from the past." Dr Stewart, 48, said although they believed marriage was right for some couples, it was about having the choice. They wanted recognition of their relationship after 10 years together, although their civil partnership is still not legally recognised in the UK. "We paid for the ceremony in pounds, we have a certificate, it was all very British, but as soon as we were back home we didn't have legal recognition," Dr Stewart said. "The declaration that we were both each other's partner was quite moving... we were on an equal footing. It was surprisingly touching." Ms Steinfeld, 35, and Mr Keidan, 40, want to secure legal recognition of their seven-year relationship but do not consider marriage suitable for them. The couple, who have a 20-month-old daughter, have said they want to formalise their relationship within a social institution "which is modern, which is symmetrical and that focuses on equality, which is exactly what a civil partnership is". "We lost on a technicality," Ms Steinfeld said. "So there's everything to fight for, and much in the ruling that gives us reason to be positive and keep going." Dan Squires, QC for the secretary of state for education, who has responsibility for equalities within government, said it had been decided at this stage not to extend civil partnerships to opposite-sex couples, or to either abolish or phase them out. Instead, he said the government planned to see how extending marriage to same-sex couples impacted on civil partnerships before making a final decision. All three judges agreed that the status quo could not continue indefinitely. 'Close the loophole' Human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell, who supported Ms Steinfeld and Mr Keidan in court, said the ruling was "a defeat for love and equality". "It cannot be right that lesbian and gay couples have two options, civil partnership and civil marriage; whereas opposite-sex partners have only one option, marriage," he said. Education campaigner and journalist Fiona Millar, who has been in a relationship with journalist Alastair Campbell for 35 years, told the court they had chosen not to get married "on principle". After the ruling, she said she was "one of thousands and thousands" of people in the UK who will be waiting for the government to "close the civil partnerships loophole by making them available to all". How do same-sex marriage and civil partnership compare? Image copyright Getty Images Equal legal treatment in matters including inheritance, tax, pensions and next-of-kin arrangements Rules for the dissolution of a civil partnership are the same as those for marriage, except that adultery cannot be used as evidence In a civil ceremony there is no requirement to exchange vows and while you can include readings, songs or music, there must be no religious component Partnership can be conducted in private, whereas marriage ceremonies must be public and can be conducted by clergy Marriage certificates include the names of only the fathers of the parties. Civil partnership certificates include the names of both parents Conservative MP Tim Loughton, who recently introduced a Private Member's Bill to give mixed-sex couples the right to a civil partnership, said the government had "no excuse" for delaying a change in the law as the bill received cross-party backing. MPs are due to debate the bill on 24 March. Lorely Burt, Liberal Democrat spokesperson for equalities, said the verdict was a "slap in the face" to mixed sex couples who want a civil partnership. Since the start of the campaign by Ms Steinfeld and Mr Keidan, more than 72,000 people have signed an online petition calling for civil partnerships to be open to all. The Same Sex Couples Marriage Act extended the right to marry to gay couples in England and Wales in 2014, allowing same-sex couples to choose between civil partnership and marriage. In 2013, there were 5,646 civil partnerships in England and Wales, but this fell by 85% in the following two years and in 2015, there were 861 couples who opted for civil partnerships over marriage. In July 2016, the Isle of Man became the only part of the British Isles where both gay and straight couples can enter civil partnerships. London couple Claire Beale, 49, and Martin Loat, 55, became the first UK couple to take advantage of the legislation in the British Crown Dependency last year, but their partnership is not legally recognised in the UK. Are you a heterosexual couple who would like to undertake a civil partnership? What do you think about the ruling against civil partnerships for heterosexual couples? Tell us your experiences by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk You can also contact us in the following ways: Tweet: @BBC_HaveYourSay Send pictures/video to yourpics@bbc.co.uk Upload your pictures/video here Text an SMS or MMS to 61124 (UK) or +44 7624 800 100 (international) Downsizing - 38884601 Or use the form below Your contact details Name (optional) Your E-mail address (required) Town & Country (optional) Your telephone number (optional) Comments (required) If you are happy to be contacted by a BBC journalist please leave a telephone number that we can contact you on. In some cases a selection of your comments will be published, displaying your name as you provide it and location, unless you state otherwise. Your contact details will never be published. When sending us pictures, video or eyewitness accounts at no time should you endanger yourself or others, take any unnecessary risks or infringe any laws. Please ensure you have read the terms and conditions. Terms and conditions View the full article
  6. Five teenage boys have been arrested by anti-terror officers after police foiled their plans to travel together to join a terrorist “organisation”. http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/five-london-teens-arrested-after-police-foil-their-plans-to-join-a-terrorist-organisation-a3471721.html
  7. Local police commander Supt Gez Chiariello, 46, is alleged to have breached of standards are in relation to authority, respect and courtesy A police commander has been suspended over allegations of gross misconduct. Milton Keynes police boss Supt Gez Chiariello is alleged to have breached standards in relation to authority, respect and courtesy. The 46-year-old joined Thames Valley Police in 2007 and became the town's area commander in 2014. He has been suspended from duty with immediate effect. Acting Supt Vince Grey has been appointed to fill his role. A date is yet to be scheduled for the misconduct hearing. Deputy Chief Constable John Campbell said: "Thames Valley Police's professional standards department is currently investigating allegations of misconduct into Supt Gez Chiariello. "The facts will be heard by a panel, chaired by a legally qualified independent chairperson, who will determine if there is a case to answer for gross misconduct and if there is, the appropriate sanction to be applied." http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-39043569
  8. The tunnel approach to Terminals 2 and 3 and the M4 spur road was closed The main approach tunnel to Heathrow Airport was blocked by protesters objecting to plans for a third runway. Three cars were parked across the road, with protesters chaining themselves to one of the vehicles at about 08:30 GMT. The tunnel, which accesses Terminals 2 and 3, was shut for more than two hours while the M4 spur road was also temporarily closed. Five people have been arrested on suspicion of obstructing a highway, the Metropolitan Police said. One of the protesters who was chained to the vehicle was taken to hospital as a precaution. The disruption caused widespread delays, as traffic was diverted to the outbound tunnel at the airport. A spokesman for the Rising Up campaign group said it was protesting against the impact a proposed third runway could have on climate change and the local area. Heathrow Airport said: "Heathrow supports the right to peaceful protest within the law, but the safety and security of our passengers, aircraft and colleagues together with the smooth running of the operation is paramount." Campaign group Back Heathrow said the actions of the protesters were "selfish, short-sighted and counter-productive". http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-39038128
  9. Recruitment Query Not Permitted On Your Account This has been posted in the wrong area of the forum. Your account does not have an active membership or a current Recruitment Pass. You must post your topic in the Recruitment Area or Force Specific Areas of our forum Recruitment Pass A Recruitment Pass can be purchased for 1 month (£2.50) or 3 months (£6) and is renewable. During its active period you will be able to create as many topics and make as many replies as you like in the Force Specific Areas and the Recruitment sections of our forum. CLICK HERE to purchase a Recruitment Pass Membership Plans You can purchase an annual Silver Membership Package for just £15 which will give you unrestricted access to the Recruitment Sections and to all of the Force Specific Areas. We also include access to the exclusive VIP areas. Click HERE to see all of the benefits of a Membership Package. We also have our Gold Membership which gives global Gold Membership across all four of our forums and is a one time lifetime fee and we even throw in a FREE mug. Forums included are www.police.community, www.ukpoliceonline.co.uk, www.policespecials.com and www.policeuk.com CLICK HERE to purchase a Membership Plan This thread has been locked as the original poster has posted this in an area of the forum where it is not permitted and their account does not currently have the required permissions.
  10. Hi all, I need some useful advice from someone who knows please without guessing or assuming. Trying to cut long story short. They said this to me, 2 weeks before my training date. They said they found a ccj and I need to pay them before they can proceed with my application. I said it was a debt under dispute, not a ccj. It was a default. Anyway, I paid it in full, they wanted to see proof that I paid, so I did just that. Soon as they rreceived the proof that I payed and showed them the receipt, they said they still weren't in a position to keep my application open and are closing it. When I challenged them, they turned round and said "the chief reserves the right to refuse appointment without giving reason under section 6 Police Act 1996" I have eventually found out that she wasnt a chief officer anyways. They have been making excuses all along my application and been unfair.
  11. Yesterday
  12. THIS is the moment a brazen squatter attempted to steal a huge bag of cannabis seized from a drugs “factory” just yards from Buckingham Palace. http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/moment-squatter-tries-to-steal-huge-bag-of-drugs-from-under-nose-of-police-after-raid-yards-from-a3470861.html
  13. Hi all. The original pair of patrol trousers issued to me in the MPS no longer fit me, and I need to get some new ones. I'd do this through the iBuy/SAP system but I suspect it may take a few weeks for them to arrive (My baton and holder along with ceremonial gloves that were supposed to be forwarded to borough in April last year still haven't arrived!). In the meantime i'd look to consider buying a pair outright, however i'm struggling to find the exact brand of trouser they use, with the criss cross mesh grid style, with the pockets halfway down on each leg, and the right colour of navy blue. Obviously I don't want to turn up for a shift in the wrong trousers.... that wouldn't go down well. The closest I can find so far are these: https://www.hivis.co.uk/uneek-uc902-cargo-combat-trousers.html?gclid=CjwKEAiAxKrFBRDm25f60OegtwwSJABgEC-ZeqQvqnr-qLu6v3eEMZ5DsLY3RUgQa2xeBEwwJRCAuBoCAjzw_wcB Although these don't appear to have the criss-cross pattern on them.... don't suppose anyone would happen to know the exact brand of the trousers? That said, not sure if they will sell them to MOP.... thanks in advance anyway.
  14. A misconduct hearing into the conduct of PCs David Stamp, Hugh Flanagan and Caroline Irwin will run until 3 March Three police officers have been accused of misconduct after failing to shut an icy road before a fatal accident. Response officers PCs David Stamp, Hugh Flanagan and Caroline Irwin face a series of alleged professional standard breaches in relation to the incident in March 2014. The trio had attended the scene of a car crash caused by ice on the A413 in Buckinghamshire, but are accused of failing to take appropriate action. A misconduct hearing started on Monday. At 04:52 GMT on 4 March 2014, driver Martin Kendall phoned Thames Valley Police to report he had crashed his car on the A413 between Wendover and Great Missenden. PC Stamp, based at Amersham Police Station, was joined at the scene by his colleagues. Alleged breaches faced by the officers: Failed to prevent anyone travelling on the A413 from suffering harm or address the risk posed by the ice Did not carry out a sufficient investigation into Mr Kendall's accident Left the scene of the accident when they should have remained Failed to warn road users of the hazard, to request other officers attend the scene or bring appropriate warning signs Left the scene without making sure the carriageway was safe Having found the carriageway needed gritting, failed to insist the controller contacted the Highways Agency It is alleged the officers left the scene at about 05:26 after concluding the accident had been caused by ice. Shortly before 05:54 there was a fatal crash very close to the location of Mr Kendall's accident, again allegedly caused by ice. The public hearing, taking place in Newbury, is set to run until 3 March. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-39027035
  15. 'No reason to fear' Vauxhall job losses, Clark says 20 February 2017 From the section Business Image copyright PA Image caption Greg Clark answers MPs questions in Parliament The business secretary, Greg Clark, has told MPs that Vauxhall workers in Luton and Ellesmere Port have no reason to fear for their jobs. His assurance came as he answered questions about the possible takeover of General Motors' European operations, including Vauxhall, by the French PSA. PSA owns both Peugeot and Citroen and its interest in buying the GM businesses was announced last week. Mr Clark met the PSA board and French industry minister last Friday. Speaking in the Commons, the business secretary said his French counterpart, Christophe Sirugue, had told him it was important that all Opel's factories across Europe were treated fairly. "We have a very strong domestic market and Vauxhall has a large share of that - something PSA recognises," said Mr Clark. "One of the points the PSA executives made to me was that since the new management of PSA has been in place, they have taken some pride in having part of their strategy not to close plants," he added. Meanwhile, Germany's deputy economy minister, Matthias Machnig, said that GM and PSA were yet to give any binding guarantees on German jobs, but that there had been some encouraging signs. 'Beacon of success' Vauxhall employs abut 4,500 workers in the UK, making cars in Ellesmere Port and vans in Luton. Mr Clark sidestepped a question about whether any sweeteners were on offer to ensure that the PSA Group - if it takes over the loss-making GM businesses in Europe - will maintain manufacturing in the UK. Image copyright PA Image caption The Vauxhall Astra production line at Ellesmere Port in Cheshire However, he said the UK car industry was very competitive, had a flexible workforce, and was investing in technology. "The UK is a beacon of success in this, and other, industries," Mr Clark said. "From my initial conversations [with PSA and General Motors] I think it is understood that Vauxhall's plants are very efficient," he added. Asked by Labour MP Pat McFadden about the future of the UK's supply chain for the car industry, the minister hailed the UK's competitive car parts sector. "That makes it attractive to investors," he said. Mr Clark also told MPs that he had mentioned the importance of looking after current and former employees who are members of the Vauxhall pension scheme, which has a deficit of up to £1bn, according to the independent pension consultant John Ralfe. Prime Minister Theresa May plans to meet Carlos Tavares, the PSA chief executive, but a time and date has not yet been fixed. Two weeks ago GM reported a loss of $257m (£206m) during 2016 at its European operations. It was the 16th consecutive loss-making year for GM in Europe, and brought its accumulated losses on the continent since 2000 to more than $15bn. Last week GM revealed that a takeover of its European operations was among "numerous strategic initiatives" being considered. View the full article
  16. A drug dealer tried to run over a policeman to avoid arrest and drove around 70 metres with the officer on his bonnet. http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/drug-dealer-drove-70-metres-with-police-officer-on-car-bonnet-a3471376.html
  17. NHS trusts overspent by nearly £900m By Nick Triggle Health correspondent 20 February 2017 From the section Health NHS trusts in England have racked up a deficit of nearly £900m in the first nine months of this financial year despite the extra money being ploughed into the service, the BBC understands. The sum is down from the record overspend of £2.45bn in 2015-16. And regulators believe the deficit could actually be cut slightly before April to between £750m and £850m. But this has only been achieved because of a special one-off £1.8bn fund this year to help hospitals plug the gap. The figures cover hospitals, ambulances, mental health units and community services - although most of the deficit has been accrued by hospitals. Between them these trusts have a budget of nearly £80bn. That is about two-thirds of the health budget as spending on GPs, training, drugs and public health are accounted for separately. Hospitals have blamed rising visits to A&E and problems discharging patients because of a lack of community services to care for patients. The accounts cover 238 trusts. In total 135 were in deficit three quarters of the way through the 2016-17 financial year. View the full article
  18. Council tax to rise while services cut, says LGA By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News website 20 February 2017 From the section UK Nearly every local authority in England is planning to raise council taxes this year but council leaders are warning services still face "deep cuts". The Local Government Association says funding care for increasing numbers of elderly people is forcing up bills. It says many councils are planning tax increases of up to 4.99% but that cuts to libraries, bin collections and other services will still be needed. The government insists it is giving more money to councils. Social care is a lifeline for people like Maureen Edwards, from Surrey, who said that after she had a fall everyday living was "difficult". She said: "They come in and they get me up in the mornings and they wash me and then they sort of bring me downstairs and I have my breakfast. "It's just like normal living now, I'm very grateful for all they've done for me." But such services are being put under strain by the ageing population and budget cuts. Councils are struggling to provide help, feed, wash or get people dressed in their own home or to pay for beds in a care home and the burden often falls on families. How can social care be funded? Who gets social care and who pays for it? Is social care getting more money? All councils in England can raise council tax by 1.99% in April without having a local referendum. The 151 social care authorities can increase bills by an extra 3% as long as that money goes on social care. The Local Government Association (LGA) says 147 of these have already agreed or are planning to raise the extra money. And three-quarters are set to introduce the maximum hike. However, the LGA says further cuts will still be needed as councils are being pushed "perilously close to the financial edge". Warwickshire County Council leader Izzi Seccombe told the BBC: "To continue it is really looking like we're cutting into the bones of services that matter to people. "It's not just social care. Things like roads, highways, bus services which are subsidised, libraries, access to leisure centres, waste services, children's services as well." Councils spent £16bn last year on services for elderly and disabled people after funding from central government was cut by a third, in real terms, during the last Parliament. Ms Seccombe said an extra £1.3bn was needed for social care in the next financial year alone. And while the council tax rises would raise about £600m, she said that would be swallowed up by paying current staff more when the National Living Wage comes into effect. Ms Seccombe added: "We need to put social care on a stable footing. "I'm worried about the impact on vulnerable people in our communities. "[And] I'm worried about what that means for carers who will be left picking up the pieces that local authorities will not be able to manage." Find out the cost of care in your area Enter a postcode, council name or N Ireland health board Submit search for results Home care What is home care? You stay in your own home while getting help with everyday tasks such as washing, dressing and eating. How your council helps with care EXPLAINER TITLE EXPLAINER P1 average amount of care provided per week, by your council average paid per hour by your council, 2014-15 average paid per hour in your region if you pay for your own care, 2016 Residential care What is residential care? You live in a care home that provides round-the-clock support with everyday tasks. How your council helps with care Average contribution per week Paying for yourself TBC pay for their own care Nursing home care What is nursing home care? You live in a care home which provides round-the-clock support for everyday tasks and nursing care. Depending on your medical needs, the NHS may contribute to your costs. How your council helps with care Average contribution per week Paying for yourself TBC pay for their own care Who gets help? How is your contribution decided? Your home Savings, investments and income are assessed, along with the value of your home - unless you or a close relative live there. Will I have anything left? Want to know more? Around the UK How the care system works across the UK The alternatives to care homes and home help Is it time for the NHS to do more? The future of care How England's cap on care costs will work Find out how the cap could affect you Useful links Age UK Independent Age NHS Choices care and support pages Care: The problem no-one can fix The alternative options How the care system works across the UK Last week charity Age UK warned that hundreds of thousands of vulnerable older people were left struggling to get by with little or no care because of cuts to care in England. Surrey County Council had toyed with raising council tax by 15% to help tackle the problem, but decided against asking local people to vote. Instead, as a social care authority, it is going for the maximum 4.99% increase. David McNulty, the council's chief executive, told the BBC: "We've saved over £450m from our annual running costs over the last six years. "We're on the way to try and save up to £700m, but we're struggling to balance next year's budget. "I think our services are at breaking point." Earlier this month, Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt, the MP for South West Surrey, said tackling social care problems was on the government's agenda. He said: "The prime minister has been very clear. We recognise the pressure's there. We recognise there is a problem about the sustainability of the social care system. "That has to be addressed and we are going to do that." A spokesman for the Department for Communities and Local Government said: "Whilst local authorities - like all public bodies - have had to find efficiency savings, our historic four-year funding settlement gives them the certainty they need to plan ahead with almost £200bn available to provide the services that local people want. "By the end of this parliament, councils will be able to keep 100% of local taxes. We've also announced an additional £900m for social care meaning councils will have £7.6bn of dedicated funding to spend over the four years." Follow James on Twitter. View the full article
  19. Last week
  20. The interviewer noted the "strong smell" of alcohol from the man in his late 40s. A thirsty motorist who turned up for an IT job with Greater Manchester Police ended up getting arrested and losing his licence. Andrew Jackson, 48, attended GMP Sedgely Park in Sedgely Park Road, Manchester, hoping to land an IT management position only to end up in court. Two senior GMP members of staff were holding the interviews and described the “overwhelming” smell of alcohol as soon as he opened his mouth. The interviewer said: “I asked if he had any trouble in finding us, as soon as he began to speak I could smell something on his breath which I was thought was stale alcohol. “He mentioned that he did have a little trouble in finding somewhere to park, which immediately raised concerns. “Shortly after he arrived in the small office, the smell of alcohol became overpowering. “I decided to continue with the interview, which lasted for about an hour, but throughout the whole time I was sure that the candidate smelt strongly of drink and was considering what to do next. “I didn’t want the man returning to his vehicle, given the obvious smell of alcohol. I couldn’t live with myself if there had been a collision and someone ended up seriously hurt.” A traffic officer was sent for who asked the interviewee if he had been drinking, to which the man said he and his wife had shared a bottle of wine with dinner the night before. The man was subsequently breathalysed showing him to be over the drink drive limit, he was then taken to Bury Police station where he was tested again to confirm the reading and charged with drink driving. On February 10, 2017, at Bury and Rochdale magistrates court Jackson pleaded guilty to being in control of a vehicle while over the legal drink driving limit. He was disqualified from driving for one year and fined £235. His driving ban will be reduced to seven months if he successfully completes a drink driving awareness course within a given time. Inspector Tony Allt, of GMP’s Roads Policing Unit, said: “Although the circumstances surrounding this particular incident are unusual, this case highlights the fact that there are a number of motorists who think they are fine to drive after drinking the night before. “There are a number of factors that can determine how alcohol is absorbed and processed in the body, but for the individual in this case to give a reading of 46 micrograms, remembering that the legal limit is 35, clearly shows that a significant amount of drink must have been consumed the previous evening. “If in doubt of your alcohol level, seek alternative travel arrangements. Never drive while over the limit and risk losing your licence, livelihood or possibly your or someone else’s life. Always make it none for the road.” View on Police Oracle
  21. Brexit: Mandelson urges Lords not to 'throw in towel' 19 February 2017 From the section UK Politics Image caption The peer said the public weren't aware of the terms of Brexit when they voted Former Labour minister Lord Mandelson has urged peers not to "throw in the towel" when they debate legislation paving the way for Brexit. He said the Lords should amend a bill to protect the rights of EU citizens to ensure a "meaningful" vote on the final deal before Britain leaves the EU. He urged fellow Labour peers to show "strength and clarity" over the issue. Conservative Justice Secretary Liz Truss said Brexit opponents were "fighting yesterday's battles". Blair: Public may rethink Brexit vote Voting data sheds light on referendum Mark D'Arcy: Lords and Brexit The House of Lords - in which the government does not have an in-built majority - will start considering proposed legislation to leave the EU on Monday. But the former Labour cabinet minister, EU Trade commissioner and Remain campaigner said the "verbal guarantees" the government were offering EU citizens in the UK were insufficient. Lord Mandelson told the Andrew Marr programme that the Lords should "reinstate" the protections into the bill in the coming weeks. "The government used its majority to bulldoze the legislation through the House of Commons," he said. "I hope it won't be so successful in the House of Lords," he said. "At the end of the day the House of Commons, as the elected chamber, will prevail but I hope the House of Lords will not throw in the towel early." 'Irrevocable process' But Ms Truss said leaving the EU was the "settled will" of the British people and the House of Lords needed to "get on" with the process. She told Andrew Marr that once the UK formally notified the EU of its intention to leave by triggering Article 50, she believed the process was "irrevocable". Image caption The justice secretary said the public and the Commons had spoken Earlier this month, MPs overwhelmingly backed a bill to empower Theresa May to begin the Brexit process. The PM wants to do this by the end of March but needs the approval of both Houses of Parliament first. MPs rejected calls for the status of EU citizens living in the UK and a parliamentary vote on the final terms of exit to be explicitly guaranteed in the bill - although ministers have conceded the Commons will have its say and it fully expects citizens of other EU countries to be able to stay in the UK after Brexit pending negotiations. Lord Mandelson also said some Leave voters who were having second thoughts at the government's "Brexit at all costs strategy" needed to have their voice heard. 'New reality' But Ms Truss said Lord Mandelson was speaking as if the referendum "never happened". She told Andrew Marr that the House of Commons had "conclusively" voted to trigger Article 50, with the majority of Labour MPs backing the government. "The fact is it is a simple bill on whether we trigger Article 50," she said. "The British people have voted for that and was clear in the referendum. "The House of Lords now needs to get on with it. I fully expect the House of Lords will recognise the will of the people and the House of Commons." Although she voted to remain in the EU last year, Ms Truss said there was now a "new reality" and if a similar vote was held in the future, she would vote to leave. Tory backbencher Dominic Raab warned the Lords would face a backlash if it tried to hold up the Brexit process. "Voters will not look kindly on unelected politicians seeking to obstruct both the result of the referendum, and the vote of their elected representatives in the House of Commons earlier this month," he said. View the full article
  22. Dame Anne Owers attacked the commissioner after he asked for greater public support for armed firearms officers. The head of the IPCC has accused the Met commissioner of falsely claiming armed officers are “increasingly” treated as suspects. Dame Anne Owers responded to Bernard Hogan-Howe’s calls for greater public support for by saying “facts don’t support” the feeling that AFOs are treated as suspects as soon as they use their weapons. The chairman of the Independent Police Complaints Commission had an article published in The Times which insisted the body “doesn’t treat police witnesses as suspects”. She said: “The debate over police use of firearms has generated a number of myths and selective facts. “This week Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, the outgoing Metropolitan Police commissioner, called for greater public support of firearms officers who, he said, were increasingly treated as suspects in investigations by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC), which I chair. “The facts don’t support this. “Since 2010 we’ve completed 24 firearms investigations, eight of which related to fatalities. “In all but three of them, including six of the fatal shootings, no firearms officer was ever treated as a suspect; they were all treated as witnesses. “Sir Bernard also complains about the length of time it takes to investigate shootings. This is something about which the police and the public are rightly concerned. But it is too easy to blame the IPCC alone. “When police witnesses co-operate fully and early, we can complete our investigations much more quickly. By contrast, when they don’t, for example giving statements that simply say when they came on and off duty or refusing to answer questions at interview, it takes much longer. “No one benefits, whether they are police officers or bereaved families.” Ms Owers went on to defend “rigorous independent scrutiny” adding: “We have proposed fresh guidance to get the best evidence when someone dies or is seriously injured. “It doesn’t treat police witnesses as suspects. It does aim to separate officers while they give their first accounts, to prevent conferring or contamination by other evidence. “Doing it early ensures that we can secure necessary evidence. Of course in a major terrorist incident we would not expect to do this until the risk had passed. “We will do our bit to make sure that our investigations are both robust and timely and the proposed guidance will help to ensure this. “Rigorous independent scrutiny is not a threat: it is a protection. If the police appear to shy away from this, there is a real risk to public trust. “As Sir Bernard has said, our police officers rarely discharge firearms, and even more rarely with fatal effect. When they do, it is in everyone’s interest that this is thoroughly investigated, with early and full co-operation from those involved.” View on Police Oracle
  23. Dame Anne Owers attacked the commissioner after he asked for greater public support for armed firearms officers. The head of the IPCC has accused the Met commissioner of falsely claiming armed officers are “increasingly” treated as suspects. Dame Anne Owers responded to Bernard Hogan-Howe’s calls for greater public support for by saying “facts don’t support” the feeling that AFOs are treated as suspects as soon as they use their weapons. The chairman of the Independent Police Complaints Commission had an article published in The Times which insisted the body “doesn’t treat police witnesses as suspects”. She said: “The debate over police use of firearms has generated a number of myths and selective facts. “This week Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, the outgoing Metropolitan Police commissioner, called for greater public support of firearms officers who, he said, were increasingly treated as suspects in investigations by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC), which I chair. “The facts don’t support this. “Since 2010 we’ve completed 24 firearms investigations, eight of which related to fatalities. “In all but three of them, including six of the fatal shootings, no firearms officer was ever treated as a suspect; they were all treated as witnesses. “Sir Bernard also complains about the length of time it takes to investigate shootings. This is something about which the police and the public are rightly concerned. But it is too easy to blame the IPCC alone. “When police witnesses co-operate fully and early, we can complete our investigations much more quickly. By contrast, when they don’t, for example giving statements that simply say when they came on and off duty or refusing to answer questions at interview, it takes much longer. “No one benefits, whether they are police officers or bereaved families.” Ms Owers went on to defend “rigorous independent scrutiny” adding: “We have proposed fresh guidance to get the best evidence when someone dies or is seriously injured. “It doesn’t treat police witnesses as suspects. It does aim to separate officers while they give their first accounts, to prevent conferring or contamination by other evidence. “Doing it early ensures that we can secure necessary evidence. Of course in a major terrorist incident we would not expect to do this until the risk had passed. “We will do our bit to make sure that our investigations are both robust and timely and the proposed guidance will help to ensure this. “Rigorous independent scrutiny is not a threat: it is a protection. If the police appear to shy away from this, there is a real risk to public trust. “As Sir Bernard has said, our police officers rarely discharge firearms, and even more rarely with fatal effect. When they do, it is in everyone’s interest that this is thoroughly investigated, with early and full co-operation from those involved.” View on Police Oracle
  24. Northumbria Chief Constable Steve Ashman wants to scrap some of the bureaucracy that comes with the job. A chief constable plans to release sergeants from their desks and move away from what he calls a “tick box mentality”. Northumbria Chief Constable Steve Ashman says the current system where “sergeants sit in front of a computer and check the checking of the checkers” is “nonsense”. He plans to arm frontline operational sergeants with laptops enabling them to access incident data away from police stations so they can work remotely. CC Ashman told Police Oracle: “You can put a lot of barriers in place in policing and a lot of constraints. For example, we are looking at something that will remove the strict requirement for sergeants to supervise every single crime that comes through. “Why? Because it is not adding any value at all and we should start trusting PCs. With the training and development we have given them, they are well-paid individuals who can do their jobs on most occasions. “If you free them up, the sergeant is free to do his or her job and focus their supervisory effort where it is needed most likes complex crimes or with officers who are struggling. You cannot do that if you have got to supervise every single theft or burglary.” Earlier this week Police Oracle reported on CC Ashman’s plans to look beyond Northumbria’s borders when promoting because forces can “stagnate” if they do not recruit from outside. He also spoke of his eagerness to see senior officers leading rather than simply checking or being “supervisory managers”. It is a forward thinking move brought about by a determination on CC Ashman’s part to allow officers to do their jobs - and also the harsh reality of extreme budget cuts. “I want us to get away from that tick box mentality when it comes to policing. What we want to say is ‘you have actually got to get out there and lead’ even though we are the hardest hit in terms of funding,” he says. “We receive the lowest amount of money in terms of our total budget from the public by way of our tax precept by a mile. “Therefore we are the force most reliant on the government’s grant in this country. So, when that grant is cut we are the worst hit – that is a reality for me and us as a force. “We are squeezing and squeezing and squeezing and if we carry on working like we have in the past it just won’t work.” Such cuts financially – while never welcome – could bring about a cultural change many officers would surely relish. “There is a tick box mentally,” says CC Ashman. “For example, with property lists, the sergeant will supervise the PCs and then the inspectors will supervise the sergeants’ supervision and then you will have a remote team who will do the checking of the inspectors – it is nonsense. What we want to do is to say actually you have to get out lead. “We have actually come to the realisation that we have got to fundamentally reengineer the way we do front line policing. We have got sergeants whose daily job it is to sit in front of a computer and check the checking of the checkers and it is nonsense. “So whether it is looking at our resource management system and some of the bureaucracy associated and scrapping all of that. Whether it is looking at property lists and a slavish adherence to that, we will be looking at all of that. Whether it is the requirement to supervise every crime that comes in - we are going to scrap all of that too.” The system would work with officers, particularly sergeants, being given the choice of where to focus their efforts and with more responsibility and more work away from their desks. CC Ashman adds: “We will say you choose where your effort is needed most and to the best effect because we trust you otherwise we would not have made you a sergeant. “Now you need to get off your backside and get out there and lead which is what they signed up to do. We, the leadership of the service, certainly here in Northumbria, have made it impossible for them to leave the station in the past so I want to address that now. “You cannot cut it all loose – they will have laptops, certainly frontline operational sergeants will, so they can access incident data outside the station without having to come back. ”But we will trust them to get out and get on with their jobs to the best of their ability.” View on Police Oracle
  25. [unable to retrieve full-text content]Northumbria Chief Constable Steve Ashman wants to scrap some of the bureaucracy that comes with the job. A chief constable plans to release sergeants from their desks and move away from what he calls a “tick box mentality”. Northumbria Chief Constable Steve Ashman says the current system where “sergeants sit in front of a computer and check the checking of the checkers” is “nonsense”. He plans to arm frontline operational sergeants with laptops enabling them to access incident data away from police stations so they can work remotely. CC Ashman told Police Oracle: “You can put a lot of barriers in place in policing and a lot of constraints. For example, we are looking at something that will remove the strict requirement for sergeants to supervise every single crime that comes through. “Why? Because it is not adding any value at all and we should start trusting PCs. With the training and development we have given them, they are well-paid individuals who can do their jobs on most occasions. “If you free them up, the sergeant is free to do his or her job and focus their supervisory effort where it is needed most likes complex crimes or with officers who are struggling. You cannot do that if you have got to supervise every single theft or burglary.” Earlier this week Police Oracle reported on CC Ashman’s plans to look beyond Northumbria’s borders when promoting because forces can “stagnate” if they do not recruit from outside. He also spoke of his eagerness to see senior officers leading rather than simply checking or being “supervisory managers”. It is a forward thinking move brought about by a determination on CC Ashman’s part to allow officers to do their jobs - and also the harsh reality of extreme budget cuts. “I want us to get away from that tick box mentality when it comes to policing. What we want to say is ‘you have actually got to get out there and lead’ even though we are the hardest hit in terms of funding,” he says. “We receive the lowest amount of money in terms of our total budget from the public by way of our tax precept by a mile. “Therefore we are the force most reliant on the government’s grant in this country. So, when that grant is cut we are the worst hit – that is a reality for me and us as a force. “We are squeezing and squeezing and squeezing and if we carry on working like we have in the past it just won’t work.” Such cuts financially – while never welcome – could bring about a cultural change many officers would surely relish. “There is a tick box mentally,” says CC Ashman. “For example, with property lists, the sergeant will supervise the PCs and then the inspectors will supervise the sergeants’ supervision and then you will have a remote team who will do the checking of the inspectors – it is nonsense. What we want to do is to say actually you have to get out lead. “We have actually come to the realisation that we have got to fundamentally reengineer the way we do front line policing. We have got sergeants whose daily job it is to sit in front of a computer and check the checking of the checkers and it is nonsense. “So whether it is looking at our resource management system and some of the bureaucracy associated and scrapping all of that. Whether it is looking at property lists and a slavish adherence to that, we will be looking at all of that. Whether it is the requirement to supervise every crime that comes in - we are going to scrap all of that too.” The system would work with officers, particularly sergeants, being given the choice of where to focus their efforts and with more responsibility and more work away from their desks. CC Ashman adds: “We will say you choose where your effort is needed most and to the best effect because we trust you otherwise we would not have made you a sergeant. “Now you need to get off your backside and get out there and lead which is what they signed up to do. We, the leadership of the service, certainly here in Northumbria, have made it impossible for them to leave the station in the past so I want to address that now. “You cannot cut it all loose – they will have laptops, certainly frontline operational sergeants will, so they can access incident data outside the station without having to come back. ”But we will trust them to get out and get on with their jobs to the best of their ability.” View on Police Oracle
  26. Domestic violence: Theresa May to oversee new law 18 February 2017 From the section UK Image copyright PA Image caption As home secretary, Mrs May introduced several new measures on domestic violence Theresa May says she will directly oversee work on a new law to tackle domestic violence amid concerns victims are being let down by the legal system. Downing Street said it was "unacceptable" some areas of England and Wales were putting more effort into tackling the problem than others. The Domestic Violence and Abuse Act aims to address an inconsistency in the use of existing offences and measures. Mrs May said tackling such abuse was a "key priority" for the government. As home secretary, Mrs May introduced a new offence against controlling and coercive behaviour and domestic violence protection orders. Domestic violence prosecutions and convictions have started to improve in recent years, and the prime minister said "no stone will be left unturned in delivering a system that increases convictions, and works better for victims". Mrs May added: "Domestic violence and abuse is a life shattering and absolutely abhorrent crime. "There are thousands of people who are suffering at the hands of abusers - often isolated, and unaware of the options and support available to them to end it. "Given the central importance of victim evidence to support prosecutions in this area, raising public awareness - as well as consolidating the law - will prove crucial." Domestic abuse in figures Year ending March 2016 1.8m People aged 16-59 who told Crime Survey for England and Wales they were a victim 1.2m Female victims 651,000 Male victims 79% Did not contact police 100,930 Cases resulted in prosecution Source: Office for National Statistics Downing Street said work on the legislation would be co-ordinated by the Home Office and Ministry of Justice, although other departments would be involved. 'Sea change' Experts working with victims will also be invited to contribute ideas and proposals. Charities and groups supporting victims welcomed the plans. Women's Aid chief executive Polly Neate said there was "scope to make the legal framework surrounding domestic abuse clearer and more comprehensive", while the NSPCC called for the needs of affected children to be prioritised. Refuge chief executive Sandra Horley said she hoped the new law "will bring the sea-change that is needed to give victims the protection they need and deserve". Mark Brooks, chairman of the ManKind Initiative charity, called for a "real step change" in supporting and recognising male victims of domestic violence, saying they made up a third of all victims. Victims' Commissioner Baroness Newlove said: "These long awaited changes will ensure those vulnerable victims and survivors are listened to and that they feel able to come forward and speak out against their abusers." Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders said: "A domestic abuse case is more likely to be prosecuted and convicted today than ever before. "However, we know this crime is often under-reported and therefore any new initiative which encourages victims to come forward is to be applauded." View the full article
  27. A senior Met detective deliberately breached guidelines in a botched attempt to convict three men for a notorious axe murder 30 years ago, a Judge ruled today. http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/met-cop-broke-rules-in-bid-to-convict-men-of-axe-murder-a3469571.html
  28. As a serving special in the Met, it's been mentioned we may be getting level 3 driver soon (basic), but that's it, the issue at the minute is the cost of paying for everyone to go on a response or pursuit driving course, until then there's no way we're getting anything beyond level 3 basic. Just waiting for my day 1 results from the D1 AC for the regs!
  1. Load more activity