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About this blog

Diary of my events as a special.

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Now, where do I begin!

I decided to do 2 8 hour shifts to make up my hours, to think I wasn't bothered about the shifts I was wrong. My first night I was paired up with a new constable from another force, it was nice as it was somebody new to talk to (make sure you get to know everyone, they're going to be your new family) Our first call, we blue lighted it to the call, it was a dropped 999 call so we blued and two'd it to the destination, it still puts a huge grin on my face even though I'm only 3 months in service. As we got there in turned out to be a domestic where a woman had beaten her husband nearly to death. I don't care what anyone says short of going to a scene where somebody has died, domestics are probably the worst jobs you can go to. This is where your resilience will definitely come in handy. We arrested the female and took her to the station, she was laughing and joking about what she'd done. It later turned out that she'd split his skull open and broke 4 of his ribs.

My colleague was finishing so I stayed on, until finish. As there was no-one in the station I could go out with, it was organised for me to go on Response again but with a sister station to us. I love response, I've only done it twice but if you get the chance take it, you'll really learn stuff.

We went to a few calls of fights and under-age drinking, however it was an hour before we were both finishing and we got a emergency call to go to a burglary in progress, I'd been to places which had been broken into but not one in progress, my heart started pounding as I could feel the adrenaline starting to kick in. I replied over our radio and that was it, fast driving, blues and two's were on and we were gone. When we arrived we could hear glass breaking inside the house, I drew my baton and reached for my CS just in case we slowly entered the building. As both me and my colleague searched downstairs a floorboard twisted indicating that there was movement upstairs we both shouted POLICE at the tops of our voices, at that point I saw someone land on the grass in the garden, I was gone off the chase was on. My colleague called for the dogs and then was after the other person. I felt like my heart was going to explode, I was running faster than I'd ever run before through gardens and driveways. As a keen rugby player I caught him and made one of the best tackles of my life. Before he could utter a word he was handcuffed and cautioned. His friend got a way meaning we had both the dogs and a helicopter out. He was later found around 30 minutes after.

I finished 2 hours after I should have, but I wasn't bothered I'd got another arrest and a damn good one at that.

My second shift was spent with a traffic officer, this was just as fun as I have a keen interest in cars. If you get offered to do this, take it, you will learn more in a shift with traffic than in 5-10 shifts dealing with traffic. Our night was mainly spent checking cars and taking response calls when not busy.

Hope this entertains you all, and if you have any questions regarding being a special or recruitment, I'll try and answer them as best I can.

Adz :thumbsup:


Hi Guys,

So thought I'd add some more to my diary as I can see a lot of people seem to what to know what you do once you've completed training. Hope this helps.

So once I'd completed training I was extremely excited but nervous too, no more playing any more, what I do now actually means something. The day after my attestation I was straight on the phone to my senior section officer asking for shifts, he was quoting me 3 weeks before I could come in. Pfft I thought, I wanted to get out with my new uniform and use everything I'd learnt. About 2 minutes after I put the phone down I had a sergeant phoning me asking if I could come in on Friday night and he'll show me round and put me out on shift. Well I thought, of course I'll accept, you couldn't stop me.

Friday came around, and I went to my station I nervously got my things out of my car and walked over to the help-desk asking for my sergeant. I was greeted by him and got told to put on my uniform including stabvest. I was then shown to our main hub and invited into a team briefing. The sergeant announced I was the new special, everyone said Hi and that was that. I was tasked with another special and we went out on active duty. This was it, I was a real police officer and I was doing real Police things. The officer 'Tom' told me we'd have to make a quick trip up to another station and I'd be given all my admin stuff like Fixed Penalty Notices, Stop & Search forms etc. I was also given my CS and Pocketbook. That was it for that night, I only did a couple of hours but already I could see that I was going to like this. Just driving past people in a police van gave me such a feeling of power and responsibility. In that these people were relying on us to go and help them in there hour of need. When I was a young boy I used to try and listen to the police radio's through our all tape machine, every so often you'd hear a crackle of police officers talking to the Comms, but now, I was listening to it through my earpiece.

My second shift was fantastic was very different, My sergeant told me it would be very beneficial for me to come in as we did drugs raids on various pubs around our force area. (I was very lucky to be allowed this, but it was a great experience and real 'eye' opener.) I had to use my airwaves terminal and my pocket book which was great. My sergeant was pushing me into situations I wasn't used to, like searching people and doing 117 checks. After we did the raids, we then went out on proactive patrol. It was fantastic! I got my first blue light run, it really is as great as it sounds. We did lots more stop and searches and went to some real jobs. I saw my first domestic (it's quite tough to deal with), car chases, pub fights and nuisance youths.

So I'm now around 2 months in and I can honestly the best thing I've ever done. If you're considering don't give it a second thought.

I got my first arrest which was awesome, it was for a warrant. As hard as you try I'm sure you'll forget your caution.

A lot of the teams are very helpful and they'll help you obtain your first arrest, after that your on your own and it can get quite competitive.

It really is true what your trainers say, the more you put into it, the more you'll get out of it. If you get chance to take part in things, don't hesitate, it'll probably be fantastic for your training and your competencies, which you've to meet within 2 years.


I've put together this diary to help all those thinking of joining, hopefully it should help!(This has already been posted in the main forum but I thought since I'm a WYP officer it may help some of you new recruits)

My life as a special started when I was at university, at the time I was studying Public Services. A friend who is now also a special was applying and kept telling me to apply as he thought I'd be good for the job. So without giving it any thought I applied, once I'd hit send that was it, I felt a stone sink to my stomach.

Around two months later I received an email from a police email address, at first I wondered what I'd done but it turned out to be a recruitment officer telling me that I'd passed the paper sift. The email warned me that the real application would come through. A couple of days later I received a fully packed a4 envelope re-confirming everything that the email had said and also my paper application forms. I was being asked everything: Health, Financial, References etc. Honestly 101 questions has nothing on these applications. I was quite concerned with the Health as I'd previously had a very serious health condition. However I completed the forms and hoped for the best.

Again around a couple of months later I got a phone call from the same recruitment officer stating that the service were happy with my application and that they'd like to offer me to come to an assessment day. I'd heard that these days were notoriously difficult to pass, so was starting to worry. All this from someone who originally wasn't too bothered about joining. I was now starting to really get into it. I think Road Wars and Traffic cops were a lot to do with it though biggrin.gif The day came round, so I put on my best and only suit and went with high hopes. I arrived at the testing centre, gave my name at reception and was told to sit in the corner. As I looked around the room I saw 7 other faces all looking as worried as I was. All of a sudden the reception door opened and a tall figure in a police uniform called us all in. We were taken into a room and sat down on individual tables. Before us were some papers, a clock beeped and we began. After the test was done we were told to go wait in the reception again, to await our interview. Interview!? I wasn't told I'd be doing an interview, my heart raced and my brain froze trying to think of what to say. I was led into a dark, boxy type room with two officers already sat there. I felt like I was on a murder charge or something, one officer greeted me and asked me the basic questions of name and such. As the interview got under-way I was asked questions about all my life and also how I felt I could meet the force competencies. I made sure I followed the other officer's body language and thought about my answers before saying them. About 30-45 minutes passed and I was told thank you for coming and we'll be in touch. As you do, I left the building thinking my police career had come to an end. I wasn't prepared, there was no way I could of passed the tests.

I later found out a couple of weeks after that I passed my assessment and interview. It seemed I was the only one out of the 7 other people.

Quite some time passed before I got my date for the medical, however when it came I was very nervous due to having a previous medical complaint. Again I put on my lovely suit and arrived at the medical testing centre. At first I was asked about my health and such, then I had the lovely drugs test whereby they took some of my DNA and my lovely yellow urine. I was then asked to sit in a small box and place some headphones on, very low frequencies were played to me and I had to push a button when I could hear them. It was a very strange feeling; however one I managed to pass. During the end of the test I was asked to go speak to the force doctor just to confirm whether he thought it would be ok for me to work, he wasn't sure so wrote to my consultant.

That was it, I had passed everything they'd thrown at me and was now awaiting a training course date. I couldn't wait, nor could I believe that I'd got this far. A lot of time passed and at one point I had thought of applying to another force as they were taking applications for regulars however on the day I was going to phone them, I received a call from my recruitment officer telling me he had a date for me. I couldn't tell you how pleased I was when I heard that. Me, a special constable... it was really going to happen.

Training was a lot of fun, it was based over six months worth of weekends, we learnt about the core basics of law and mainly things we'd be dealing with once we got out on those mean streets. The trainers were fantastic, always there to lend a hand whether you were at training or at home, they were nice enough to give you their personal mobile numbers for help. The group that I was in was quite a diverse group of some old and some young, but we all got along and are still friends to date. During the training we had a couple of tests to contend with, which you should make sure you revise for! I think the day to look most forward to is going for your uniform fitting, It really makes it feel like it's becoming a reality!

A couple of the days to watch out for are your defensive tactics (yes it's true you do get sprayed with CS and yes it hurts) your pre-patrol day (such good fun, and informative too) and your attestation day (start polishing your boots as soon as you get them and learn how to march).

So that's it. I'm now a fully fledged Special Constable, of course I'm still a probationer and I know the work starts here. Be prepared for about 35-40% of things you've learned to mean something. Since I've been patrolling I've realised that they don't teach you quite a lot of things, but I guess that's for you to learn.

Now that I'm based at my station I'm mainly tasked with NPT duties. This can range on doing events, scene guarding, to going out with Response. The new teams I'm working with are lovely and all are very helpful. I don't think you seem to get the officers that don't respond well to Specials any more, I haven't yet found anyone like that anyway.

Part 2 coming soon.